How to Select a Gym to Match Your Goals

So you want to join a new gym. How should you choose amongst the many and varied gyms out there? It can be confusing to prioritise all the different considerations, and very easy to be swayed by a good salesperson when you visit a gym. Arm yourself with this checklist so that you make the best decision for you. And always visit a number of gyms before making your final decision.

Location

You need a gym that’s convenient to get to. If it takes too long to get to, you’re less likely to use it as often as you should (ideally 3 times a week). So consider one within walking distance (cuts out the problems of public transport delays or traffic jams), or if you’re driving there, check ease (and cost) of parking. One near home or work would be ideal, depending on the days and times you wish to train.

Beware, just because a gym is geographically quite near you, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s convenient. I live in London, and one gym I joined was 2 miles down the road, but the public transport to that gym was so slow, it took me longer to reach than the next gym I joined, 3 miles away, but really well connected with a door to door train ride. So make sure you do the journey at the time you plan to use the gym, go get an accurate idea of journey times.

Equipment

The key question you need to ask yourself is, “what are my goals?”. Then choose a gym whose equipment matches your goals. So if you’re after muscle growth, choose a gym with ample free weights (dumbbells and barbells, cable crossovers, benches with both flat and incline options, squat racks). And if yoga and stretching is your thing, you need a gym with a yoga studio and plenty of space for stretching.

Check out the layout of the gym. Does it feel energising to you? Is there space to move around? Is the balance of equipment right for you? Personally I don’t like vast rows of treadmills as far as the eye can see, with little alternative cardio equipment (cross trainers, bikes, rowing machines). And I hate small cramped free-weights areas, I like my free-weights areas to be spacious and a good distance between weights benches to avoid bumping into the person next to you. I’ve been in some gyms in Australia where the free weights areas were awesome. Less so in the UK.

Another thing to consider is the music in the gym. Do you want loud music, or do you prefer to work out in a quiet atmosphere? One gym I used had 2 floors with an open mezzanine, with loud rock music from the upper level clashing with the loud pop music downstairs, which was massively irritating to the ears.

Staff

The first people you’ll probably see are the reception staff. Are they welcoming, friendly, knowledgeable? All these things count for a lot if you’re going to interact with them every time you come to the gym.

Then consider the availability of gym instructors and personal trainers. Are they available, attentive, and approachable? Talk to them and you’ll see.

One thing that put me right off one gym I visited was reception staff eating doughnuts, painting their nails (and that was just the guys), and when I left, I saw one of the gym instructors standing outside smoking a cigarette. Ugh.

In contrast, my current gym has friendly, lively, chatty and knowledgeable staff. It makes such a huge difference to your gym experience. All the personal trainers and gym instructors have their photos on the wall, with a brief biog about them. I chat to them about the latest workout trends, nutrition tips, and they’re all really knowledgeable. So when you visit a gym with a view to joining, try chatting to some of the staff and you’ll get an idea of how friendly and knowledgeable they are.

Showers & Changing Rooms

This is where most gyms let themselves down badly. The changing rooms are often cramped, with small/narrow lockers which are a struggle to get all your stuff into. Once I took a sports bag …

Fitness First

Whatever your reasons you are to be commended, but how exactly does one go about getting into shape. Well here are a few suggestions to improve your fitness health and lifestyle. With each suggestion there are pros and cons, some will work for some people and some will not, try and decide what fits you and your circumstances best.

Join A Gym – This is a pretty obvious place to start. At a gym you have a variety of methods of getting fit, whether it’s aerobically or based on toning muscle you will find this a great place to start. At a gym you can get the help of a professional who will guide your fitness while keeping their well trained eyes on your progress. However, while a gym is a great way to get fit, it’s also very expensive and can be time consuming!

Running – A great way to get fit and virtually free! If you want to take up running a word of caution, running can cause injury. You must follow routines and have good quality foot wear. Running on tarmac is usually more convenient but it can damage your knees, so where possible try to run on grass or even better on a beach if this is an option. When you start off running, start slowly and build up the distances over the weeks. Start by slowly jogging for 5 minutes, as your fitness increases you can run further and at a faster pace. Do not push yourself to hard as this will lead to injury. Experts recommend doing a full run on day one, day two run half the distance at a slower pace, this relaxes the muscles and lessens the chances on injury. Then on day three rest. You can then start the cycle over. This is a great way to improve fitness and it will really enhance your endurance.

Swimming – Possibly the best way to get fit! Swimming tones all of your body and gives all your muscles an excellent work out. The great advantage of swimming is that it’s almost impossible to injure yourself. Many people swim to recover from injury and this can be a great way to build up worn down muscles. Similar to running, don’t over do it and take a day to rest up on a regular basis so not to exhaust your muscles. Again start slow and build up distances as you increase your level of fitness. The only real disadvantage of swimming is that you need somewhere to do it, some people may not have a nearby pool so this could be an issue. Otherwise swimming is a great fitness booster.

Aerobics – Something that is not as popular as it once was, but is still a really good way to get fit. Whether you join a class or do it in the privacy of your own home, this is a great way to get fit. It’s a low impact activity so again the danger of injury is minimal. Buying DVD’s to watch and follow fitness programmes is very helpful and can really improve muscle tone and general fitness. The only possible downside to aerobics is that if you want to be super fit it tends to be limited. You will probably have to do something else as well to take your fitness to a higher level.

Cycling – Another great low impact activity that really can get you super fit. After purchasing a bike it’s pretty much free and as you increase the distances you cycle you can travel round some interesting places which makes it an enjoyable activity. The risk of injury is low, unless you fall off, then this can be a real danger. But if you ride sensibly and safely you should not have any problems and you will find cycling a wonderful way to boost fitness levels.

Sports – This is one that many people take up. Some people find running or swimming boring as it can just be you on your own. They need the thrill of competitive games to excite them. Playing sport on a regular basis is a great way to get fit. Depending on the sport …

Cardiovascular fitness is sometimes referred to as “cardiovascular endurance” because a person who possesses this type of fitness can persist in physical exercise for long periods of time without undue fatigue. It has been referred to as “cardio-respiratory fitness” because it requires delivery and utilization of oxygen, which is only possible if the circulatory and respiratory systems are capable of these functions.

The term “aerobic fitness” has also been used as a synonym for cardiovascular fitness because “aerobic capacity” is considered to be the best indicator of cardiovascular fitness and aerobic physical activity or exercise is the preferred method for achieving it. Regardless of the words used to describe it, cardiovascular fitness is complex because it requires fitness of several body systems.

Good cardiovascular fitness requires a fit heart muscle. The heart is a muscle; to become stronger it must be exercised like any other muscle in the body. If the heart is exercised regularly, its strength increases; if not, it becomes weaker. Contrary to the belief that strenuous work harms the heart, research has found no evidence that regular progressive exercise is bad for the normal heart. In fact, the heart muscle will increase in size and power when called upon to extend itself. The increase in size and power allows the heart to pump a greater volume of blood with fewer strokes per minute. The average individual has a resting heart rate of between seventy (70) and eighty (80) beats per minute, whereas it is not uncommon for a trained athlete’s pulse to be in the low fifties or even in the forties.

The healthy heart is efficient in the work it does. It can convert about half of its fuel into energy. An automobile engine in good running condition converts about one-fourth of its fuel into energy. By comparison, the heart is an efficient engine. The heart of a normal individual beats reflexively about 40 million times a year. During this time, over 4,000 gallons, or 10 tons, of blood are circulated each day, and every night the heart’s workload is equivalent to a person carrying a thirty-pound pack to the top of the 102-story Empire State Building.

Good cardiovascular fitness requires a fit vascular system. Healthy arteries are elastic, free of obstruction and expand to permit the flow of blood. Muscle layers line the arteries and control the size of the arterial opening upon the impulse from nerve fibers. Unfit arteries may have a reduced internal diameter because of deposits on the anterior of their walls, or they may have hardened, nonelastic walls.

Fit coronary arteries are especially important to good health. The blood in the four chambers of the heart does not directly nourish the heart. Rather, numerous small arteries within the heart muscle provide for coronary circulation. Poor coronary circulation precipitated by unhealthy arteries can be the cause of a heart attack.

Veins have thinner, less elastic walls than arteries. Also, veins contain small valves to prevent the backward flow of blood to the heart. The veins are intertwined in the muscle; therefore, when the muscle is contracted the vein is squeezed, pushing the blood on its way back to the heart. A malfunction of the valves results in a failure to remove used blood at the proper rate. As a result, venous blood pools, especially in the legs, causing a condition known as varicose veins.

Good cardiovascular fitness requires a fit respiratory system and fit blood. The process of taking in oxygen (through the mouth and nose) and delivering it to the lungs, where the blood picks it up, is called external respiration. External respiration requires fit lungs as well as blood with adequate hemoglobin in the red blood cells. Insufficient oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood is called anemia.

Delivering oxygen to the tissues from the blood is called internal respiration. Internal respiration requires an adequate number of healthy capillaries. In addition to delivering oxygen to the tissues, these systems remove CO2. Good vascular fitness requires fitness of both the external and internal respiratory systems.

Cardiovascular fitness requires fit muscle tissue capable of using oxygen. Once the oxygen is delivered, the muscle tissues must be able to use oxygen to sustain physical performance. …

Body-Solid GEXM2000 Multigym Review

Are you looking for fitness equipment that can give you a full-body workout without taking up too much space or needing constant servicing? If so, the Body-Solid GEXM2000 Multigym may be just the machine you’ve been looking for. Let’s look at some of the pros and cons of this multi-functional exercise machine.

Pros of the Body-Solid GEXM2000

The Body-Solid GEXM2000 is a traditional multigym that has been on the market for several years. Despite this, it is a truly versatile machine that’s hard to beat. Here are some of the exercises you can do to exercise your abdominals, biceps, triceps, glutes, thighs, quads, and more:

Bench Press
Ab Crunches
Leg Curls
Pull Downs
Seated Rows
Leg Curls
Bent Over Rows
Triceps Press Downs

Also, if you don’t have a lot of room, don’t worry. The Body-Solid GEXM2000 offers a nice, compact design, and will fit into a space of 4′ x 5′. But not only is it made for tight spaces, it’s also made for comfort. This machine has thick, comfy seats, extra-large foam rollers to reduce stress on the knees and buttocks when exercising for long periods of time. They are also adjustable (in terms of height and resistance) so that people of all physiques can enjoy a good workout.

Cons of the Body-Solid GEXM2000

Now certainly this (or any) multigym isn’t right for everybody. Multigyms are more expensive than many other types of fitness machines such as treadmills and cross trainers. So if you’re not sure if you can devote the time and effort to regular exercise, you may be better off going to a fitness centre or buying a less expensive item when first starting out. You can also invest some more money into fitness once you’re sure you are fully committed. Also, multigyms generally require some assembly. This means you must read the instructions carefully and take the time to assemble it right. An improperly assembled machine can increase the risk of strain or injury.

All things considered, the Body-Solid GEXM2000 multigym is a good investment for beginners or experts who want to shape up and trim down. They offer a tremendous number of exercises to enjoy in the comfort of your own home. So if you’re ready to raise your metabolism and get rid of unwanted body mass, why not give this quality piece of fitness equipment a try?

Source by Robert Mc Kay

In the first part to this article I showed you how your health and fitness results are a direct result of your health and fitness decisions. You are responsible whether you like it or not. In this second part to the article, I share with you how saying you are not responsible robs you of your health and fitness power, while taking responsibility, give you all the power you need. Plus I share the one big step you need to take as soon as you have taken responsibility.

When you do not take responsibility for you health and fitness, you rob yourself of the majority of your power over your health and fitness. You may say “I am this way because of my genes, or my metabolism.” Well what influence do you have over your genes or metabolism? Very little or none. If you grant power over your health and fitness to external influences your outlook is bleak. You have no chance. The world is a scary place, and you are at its mercy.

On the other hand, if you say “My genes and metabolism are just an influence on me, and I am ultimately responsible for my health and fitness” you claim back your power (didn’t you feel a little of that power as your read those words?). The world is a brighter place and you can for the most part, chose what you do, where you go, and what you achieve.

Those who have taken responsibility for their health and fitness are plain to see. They are the sports stars, and athletes that are idolised (don’t you have a favourite sport’s hero?), or those fit people that you know which everyone takes notice of and admires. Every one of these people has taken responsibility for their health and fitness.

Once you tell yourself that you are responsible for your health and fitness, and that you are able to work with influences such as genes, metabolism, or the lingering effects of past illnesses or injuries, you must take THE FIRST BIG STEP.

What is this first big step? It is to start getting yourself a health and fitness education.

Most people’s health and fitness education stopped the moment they left school, or college. Your health education should be a life long study, rather than just a few years in formal education. Rather than your teachers being responsible for your education, you need to realise that you need to be responsible, and responsible on an on going basis for the rest of your life. It is only by acquiring this knowledge will you know how to act to ensure that you become healthy and fit and remain so for the rest of your life (like me learning about the effects of smoking on my sight).

And it is not difficult. Taken a little bit at a time over the rest of your life, it is easy, and becomes, enjoyable and second nature. Health knowledge is all around. In newspapers, magazines, on the television, books, and on the internet. And as soon as you tell yourself that you want to learn what you are reading, you will automatically take more in and remember it more. And the more times you read something, the more it sinks in. Make yourself the habit of reading every health and fitness article twice. You’ll be amazed at the results.

What about the maze and masses of often conflicting information out there? Well, I can tell you from experience that this is a little bit of a myth. You’ll be surprised at how quickly you’ll find that the maze is not as big as you expected it to be.

So decide today to empower yourself by taking responsibility for your health and fitness, and start getting your lifelong health and fitness education.

Source by Damian Miles

The Best Fitness Tracker

Fitness is important, but it is more important to track your fitness, especially when you are working with set goals. Tracking makes it possible for you to know whether you are making the right progress or whether you need to make improvements to your workouts to make it easier to reach to the fitness goals that you have set. Fitness bands are amazing trackers that can come in handy for anyone. However, the Garmin Vivofit band can be considered to be the best fitness tracker of all. The band is simply designed for that perfect and comfortable fit in that it can be worn all day and still remain comfortable for the wrist. The band is water resistant to withstand sweat and it can be worn even for the toughest workouts possible.

The Main Features

The features of any product are what make it what it is and worth the value that it is. The same is the truth for this fitness band. It has amazing features that make it stand out from the rest of the fitness bands that are available in the market.

The move bar: This is an interesting feature which keeps you in the know of just how active you have been throughout the day. On sensing that you have not been moving enough, a red bar appears on the band. You will see the bar in case you have been inactive for an entire hour. It is part of the programming on this band that makes it the best fitness tracker.

The battery: Most fitness bands in the market need to be charged every day. The Garmin, however has a long life battery that can go for a whole year without needing any charging. Some users might need to charge the band every month but this is still a long enough time compared to the daily charging requirements of other bands. You get the chance to concentrate more on your fitness than the band which is really nice.

Monitoring function: Besides monitoring your workouts every day, this band also has a monitoring function that can help you see how much sleep you get every night. Sleep is very important when keeping fit since a lack in enough sleep can lead to breakdown and exhaustion. This can make it harder to keep up with any fitness goals that you have. With this function, you will make improvements as soon as you see a need to, which will be good for your goals and health in general.

Stats trackers: They are also found in other fitness bands and they help in charting calories burned every single day and the metabolic burning rate. It is definitely one of the most important features of any fitness tracker. The charts help you know how close you are getting to the goals you have set.

Other features that make the band the best fitness tracker include being lightweight, Bluetooth connectivity and the pedometer function which can tell you how many steps you take every day and therefore how active you are.

Source by Shalini Mittal

10 Steps to Reach Your Fitness Goals

Summer is quickly approaching and the beaches will soon welcome bikinis and swim trunks. Are you ready? Well, don’t worry. If you’re not prepared to brave the throngs of people flocking to the beaches, here is a plan to get you in shape.

Step # 1 Start by setting your specific fitness goals

A.Make sure your goals are realistic. You can safely loose 1-2.5 pounds per week. So a realistic goal would be “I want to loose 30 pounds by August 1, 2009. This would be a realistic goal.

Step #2 Set a realistic target date

A.Losing weight should be a long-term goal for a healthy lifestyle. Think of setting great nutrition and exercise habits that will last a lifetime.

B.Changing your lifestyle can be very stressful in the beginning; the stress levels increase when you add the weight of an unattainable goal. Setting unrealistic weight loss dates can lead to frustration causing you to give up.

Step #3 Make sure your goals are your personal goals

A.Decide what you want for yourself. Is it a life of improved overall fitness or lower blood pressure? Know that the goals you set for yourself is not a reflection of what others have set for you.

B.The pressure of starting a new program combined with the expectations of others can often be overwhelming. Share your goals only with people whom you feel will encourage and support you. If you are in an environment where others are not supporting your efforts, DO NOT share your goals with them. Misery loves company. So, surround yourself with positive people.

Step # 4 Is Simple. Write your goals down

A.Be creative with how you present your goals.

B.Find colorful paper to make your goals come to life.

Step #5 Post your goals and pictures

A.Place your goals where you can see them daily. Tape your goals to Your refrigerator, bathroom door, office computer, workstation or car Dashboard. Place your goals anywhere you spend a lot of time.

B.Visualization is 8 times faster than auditory learning. Use visual stimuli that include photographs, or those bikini/swim-trunks that you have been eyeing.

Step #6 Plan your meals accordingly

A.Part of a good plan begins with today. Make out a schedule that includes preparation time for meals.

B.Don’t use your schedule as an excuse to stop at the local fast food joint to get combo #1.

C.Never skip a meal. The most important meal of the day is breakfast. No, not Krispy Kremes and Starbucks, they are not a great way to start your day. Skipping meals during the day slows your metabolism down. When your metabolism slows down your body burns fewer calories, thus storing unnecessary fat. The reality is you must eat healthy in order to safely loose weight.

Items to Include Items to Exclude

Anything baked, grilled, or broiled Anything Fried

Protein from Chicken, or fish, tuna Soda

Low Fat Cheese Cheese

Water, Water and Water Juice

Whole Wheat Bread White Bread

Fresh Steamed Vegetables White Rice

Olive Oil Butter

Egg Whites Tap Water

Sweet Potatoes

Bananas

Step #7 Write down your plan of action (Exercise)

A. In order to reach your goal you must have a plan of action.

B. Decide what steps are necessary to achieve your fitness goals.

C. OK, you have your goals and nutrition plan written. The next

Step is to plan your routine for movement. Cardiovascular Activities may include

one or more of the following:

1.Brisk walking, while pumping arms as if running

2. Jumping Rope

3.Walk-Run Combination

4.Rollerblading

5.Pilates, Yoga

6.Swimming

7.Bike riding

8.Walking your dog

9.Jogging

10.Dancing

Beginners 10-15 minutes

Intermediate 20-30 minutes

Advance 30-60 minutes

Step # 8 Keys to your Success

What you eat is 80 of your success rate. The other 20 percent is how you change your lifestyle to incorporate physical activities. Before beginning any fitness routine, please consult a physician.

Step #9 Be Patient

A. Ask yourself how long did it take to gain weight? If you average More than 2-3 years, it is realistic that you have developed bad habits over time. So, it will take at least 6 months to develop healthier habits.

B.Self Discipline and Follow Thru are the two hardest …

Shoulder, Thorax & Thoracic Spine

The shoulder & pectoral girdle has 3 bones, 3 joints, and 1 articulation. The chest cavity, or thorax, consists of 12 vertebrae connected to 12 pairs of ribs which connects to the sternum in the front of the body. The thorax forms an elastic but firm cavity that protects vital organs. It also generates a punctum fixum (fixed point) for the functional mobility of the upper and lower extremities to transfer forces between the them. Designed functionally to enhance breathing oxygen and releasing carbon dioxide. Our structural architecture provides the vehicle for you to lead your life and the direction it follows.

Anatomy

The shoulder joint or glenohumeral joint (GH) is a ball-and-socket joint between the glenoid fossa of the scapula and head of the humerus bone. It is the most mobile joint in the body and most frequently dislocated. The glenoid fossa is shallow but deepened by a fibrocartilaginous rim called the glenoid labrum and anomalies or variations in size and thickness occur. Comparable to a golf ball on a tee horizontally, the shoulder joint has a fibrous capsule that envelops the entire articulation, but with a laxity which affords both Active and Passive Range of Motion (ROM). Ligaments reinforce the static and dynamic stability of the joint in varying directions and positions. There are many bursae (fibrous sacs of synovial fluid) around the joint in specific locations to protect the tendons which move over bones quickly with extreme forces. The subacromial bursae is subject to irritation causing inflammation and referred to as Impingement Syndrome, which is a specific and localized sensation on the top of your shoulder when you lift your arm up. The pectoral girdle consists of two scapulae and two clavicles. The medial portion of the clavicle attaches to the top of the sternum at the sternoclavicular (SC) joint. The distal clavicle connects to the scapula at the acriomioclavicular (AC) joint. The acromion, a uniquely evolved bone feature of the scapula has three types or shapes formed congenitally (Type I or flat 17%, Type II or curved 43%, Type III or hooked 40%) that can affect the odds of having rotator cuff injury (Type III ~65%) and detected via a x-ray study. The shoulder blade or scapula also moves or, glides, over the ribs or thorax cage via the scapulothoracic interface when lifting the arm upward and out.

Scapulohumeral Rhythm: a 2:1 ratio during shoulder abduction between the humerus and the scapula. As the arm lifts the angulation of the scapula moves at half the rate. Sometimes this can cause a clunk-clunk-clunk sound as the shoulder blade moves over the ribs and may indicate a muscular imbalance. If pain or discomfort occupies your shoulder, don’t wait to get it evaluated. Quick and effective treatment exists within a thorough soft tissue examination and clinical experience.

Thoracic Spine

The 12 thoracic vertebrae create a kyphotic curve, a primary curve in our spine, formed within the womb. The curve is opposite in the neck and low back. Thoracic vertebrae are connected or hinged via costovertebral joints to 12 pairs of ribs (7 true and 5 false). A dozen vertebrae interconnected via multiple facet joints allowing motion. The top 6 vertebrae or the upper thoracic spine rotate and lateral flex due to coronal facets. The lower thoracic spine has less rotation and lateral flexion but more flexion and extension are due to sagittal facets. But keep in mind we are all unique and variations within the spine known as congenital anomalies. Midline of chest is the sternum, the manubrium at the top and the xiphoid process at the bottom. There are 10 ribs that attach to the sternum via costal cartilages and the bottom 2 ribs float in the muscles of the abdominal wall.

Muscles of the Shoulder & Thorax

Muscles of Scapular Stabilization: Trapezius, Rhomboid Major/Minor, Levator Scapulae, Serratus Anterior, Pectoralis Minor

Movements of the Scapula: Depression, Elevation, Protraction, Retraction, Upper Rotation

Muscles of the Rotator Cuff: Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Minor, Subscapularis

Movements of the Glenohumeral Joint: Internal & External Rotation, Abduction & Adduction, Flexion & Extension

Shoulder Range of Motion

Flexion: 150-170 ~ Extension: 35-45

Horizontal adduction: 130-160 ~ Abduction: 40-50

Abduction: 160-180 ~ Adduction: 20-40

External/Internal Rotation …

If you have been diagnosed with gastroparesis or functional dyspepsia you know how painful it can be to eat vegetables. Here are two gastroparesis diet tips to help you to safely add more vegetables (and more nutrition) into your gastroparesis diet.

Tip #1 Make Your Own Vegetable Purees

If you have been diagnosed with gastroparesis you might have been advised to eat small amounts of baby food for easily tolerated and digestible nutrition. However, making your own baby food tastes better, and it’s more varied and more nutritious. You can start by investing in a powerful blender, such as the Vitamix blender, to make your own vegetables purees. You also want to invest in a fine mesh strainer and a rubber spatula to strain the purees. It is important to invest in a powerful blender because a powerful blender will make your vegetable purees silky smooth and easier to digest.

Make sure to peel vegetables with fibrous peels such as sweet potatoes. Then just boil or steam (more of the nutrients are preserved with steaming) the vegetables until tender. Let them cool and then blend them in a powerful blender, such as a Vitamix, until creamy and smooth with some of the cooking water to reach the desired consistency. Add more or less of the cooking water according to what you think will be easiest for you to digest. Then pour the puree through a fine mesh strainer using a rubber spatula to speed up the straining process.

You can add a little bit of lemon juice (if it doesn’t upset your stomach) and sea salt to add some flavor. Put your vegetable purees in glass containers with lids and they should last in the refrigerator for about 3-5 days. If you want to freeze your vegetable purees you can pour the purees into an ice cube tray which you can thaw in the future to make individual servings.

You can use 1 type of vegetable such as well cooked and peeled summer squash, peeled broccoli, peeled carrots, peeled asparagus, de-stemmed mushrooms, peeled sweet potatoes, or a combination of vegetables. Use your discernment to choose which vegetables will be the easiest for you to digest.

Tip 2# Juice Your Vegetables

Investing in a good juicer can help you to get the benefits of consuming raw fruits and vegetables without upsetting your gastroparesis symptoms.

You will still want to invest in a fine mesh strainer to strain your juice to strain out any of the remaining fiber.

Some vegetables that are good to juice are cucumber, celery, carrots, and beets. Wash and peel the vegetables and run them through a juicer. I recommend the Omega 4000 juicer for this purpose. Remember to drink your juice slowly and in small quantities to make sure you are able to tolerate it well.

I hope that these two tips will help you to add more vegetables into your gastroparesis diet and if you are interested in the kitchen appliances I mentioned in the article please check out the resources below:

Source by Cecilia Benjumea

The Right Fitness Center – What to Consider

This is a facility that offers its clients a place that has exercise equipment for the purpose of getting physically fit The memberships of these fitness centers can be as inexpensive as $10 a month or as much as $700 a year. It depends on the location of the center and the amenities and equipment offered. When you are choosing a fitness center there are many things that you should consider before making your final decision.

One of the main things that you should consider is your level of comfort. The reasons this is important is that if you are self conscious or uncomfortable about working out then you are most likely not going to stay motivated to go on a regular basis. When it comes to your level of comfortableness with the fitness center, there are also other issues to think about. You should make sure that the center is well lit and clean, that it has the state of the art equipment and is it in good repair. Is there an instructor to show you in how to use the different pieces of equipment properly? You are going to a fitness center to get fit and healthy so it is important that you know how to maximize the benefits from the different pieces of equipment. You also need to make sure that there are private, clean showers and restrooms.

Another important consideration is the location. You want to make sure that it is conveniently located near your home because no one wants to drive twenty miles or so to a fitness center. You want to be sure that it is located in an area that is safe and well lit, especially if they offer early morning or late night hours. Check to see if they have a decent size parking lot and that it is also well lit.

Another key factor is the availability or the hours that the center is open. No one works the same hours nor has the same hours that can go to the fitness center so the hours open need to fit your schedule. Some fitness centers today are open twenty-four hours a day seven days a week but still have certain hours that they will be open and have instructors in the center. To utilize the center after those hours you will to have a pass card, like a hotel uses, in order to get into the fitness center. For these types of centers, it is very important that the parking is close to the building and the parking lot is very well lit. The last two factors is the cost per month or year and if the center offers any fitness classes.

Source by Lora Davis

Back to top