Tag: Dancing

Linda Hymes shares a full repertory of delicious, healthy recipes that are fit for dancers and non-dancers alike in The Dancing Gourmet: Recipes To Keep You on Your Toes. Heck, these are recipes to keep you fit. Hymes knows the secrets of preparing tantalizing dishes that won’t add to your waistline- she trained at the prestigious School of American Ballet in New York City before becoming a professional ballerina for fifteen years. After retiring, she pursued her greatest passion- food- and attended the world-renowned Le Cordon Bleu in London.

The Dancing Gourmet is a perfect marriage of gourmet food and elegant aesthetic. Anyone who loves ballet or who wishes to look like a dancer by eating right will enjoy the mouth-watering, colorful photos of food and Hymes during some of her finest dancing moments- both seem to jump right off the page. The Dancing Gourmet is flavored with humor throughout it pages: the recipes are categorized by ballet’s positions of the feet, from first position (appetizers and small plates) through fifth position(entrees). The final section involves the prerequisite visit to the Land Of the Sweets (a reference from the second act of the much-beloved Nutcracker) which no ballet career or gourmet dining experience should be without.

Eating right doesn’t have to be a punishment. In fact, it can be quite pleasurable. Choices from the third category of salads (not just rabbit food!, according to Hymes) such as the grilled chicken salad with spicy blackberry dressing, thai eggplant salad with pickled garlic, and sole and salmon twirls with maple glaze are appealing, or curried banana balls with masoor daal and cold sesame soba with tofu for the vegetarian crowd. Top it all off with a cup of fresh-brewed chai and a slice of pavlova cake. Brava!

Source by Grier Cooper

Line dancing is perfect for the single person who wants to get out and meet new friends, get some some exercise and just enjoy the conviviality that goes with Boot scootin 'country music! Mostly based on country and western music there are some great dances based on other types of music as well.

Dancers come from all the echelons of society to learn new ways of finding out where they have forgotten muscles. The clothing worn does not have to be expensive; most people have a pair of jeans in their wardrobe. Jazz up the jeans with all sorts of boots and bling to suit the occasion. Some women like to wear skirts in all styles, ranging from the tiered look to short skirts. Tee shirts are appropriate and worn by either men or women. The girls always look nice in gypsy styled tops, which are very fashionable now any way.

The shoes or boots worn should be comfortable and have soles that you can twist, scuff and sachet on! This rather rules out sneakers or sport shoes but some people manage just fine with them too. If you are keen to get some proper boots, go for the better quality ones. They come in many materials, or hides to get the look! Check out the stitching to see if the quality is there. The bottom line in clothing is really wear what you feel the most comfortable in and can enjoy yourself line dancing.

There are hundreds of dances and variations of similar movements. There is at least a 1000 dances and that number increases as the years go by. Choreographers write the steps and fit them to the music they require, there is such a huge range of country music and others to choose.The beats vary from waltzes to rock 'n roll the latter tends to be danced by the experienced dancers and is amazing to watch if you suffer from two left feet. People I know have learnt over 350 dances and have been in the line-dancing scene for many years.

Learning requires a patient teacher and a patient pupil! For the older learner it is a totally new experience trying to learn dance movements, generally because it's been many years for some since they got into active participation of sports or exercise. There are some dances especially for beginners, and as the steps are mastered, your range of dances increases, as does the level of expertise. Find yourself a local club and enjoy the line-dancing scene. It is inevitably friendly and no one feels stupid for not being able to learn as fast as others are.

Source by Maman Wilson

Line Dancing is the Second Most Popular Thing Seniors Like to Do!

Line dancing is very popular among Senior Citizens. It’s fun, there is great camaraderie among the Seniors, and you don’t need a partner, and it’s an easy way to stay healthy, both mentally and physically.

An Activity Director at a Retirement/Convalescent Home in California told me that line dancing is only second in popularity to square dancing and only because square dancing is an older form of dancing and more Seniors are familiar with it. Also, many Seniors were in square dance clubs and went to meetings each week when they were younger.

At almost any class in line dance instructions, you will see many Seniors. There are several dances suitable for people with limited mobility, such as  “Tush Push”, “Electric Slide”, “Country Walkin'”, “Dancin’ with You” and the ever beautiful, “Waltz Across Texas”, which I love to do to Collin Raye’s “Dreamin’ My Dreams of You.” There is even a “sit down” tongue-in-cheek line dance by Knox Rhine called “Take A Break” which doesn’t even need music! Most classes feature easy line dances as well as more advanced.

Health Benefits

The health benefits of line dancing are obvious. Everyone benefits from exercise and line dancing is so much fun, it doesn’t seem like exercise. I read a report that said that people who line dance could possibly live an extra ten years. This may or may not be true, but it’s certainly something to consider.

Here is a list of some of the health benefits you will enjoy if you line dance on a regular basis:

* Cardiovascular and muscular strength and flexibility become better;

* High blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and high triglyceride levels, as well as high blood sugar levels can all improve;

* Coordination improves as you work through the different movements;

* Lung capacity can increase;

* Bone strength can increase; bone loss can be stopped or slowed down

* Help with weight control – half an hour of continuous line dancing can burn an average of 300 calories

* The social aspects of  line dancing are obvious. Your sense of well-being and the camaraderie you have with the other dancers is wonderful for your health.

Line Dance Videos are available everywhere

There are many line dance DVDs and videos that Seniors can purchase and use to practice in the privacy of their homes. This is especially good if they are shy about going to a regular class or don’t have a class in their community that teaches line dancing for seniors.

Scooter Lee and Jo Thompson

The lovely and talented singer/songwriter Scooter Lee has many classes targeted towards Seniors through her non-profit organization, Dancing for the Dream®, which she started with choreographer Jo Thompson.

As popular as her music was for line dancing, at first Scooter Lee didn’t line dance herself, even after being diagnosed with numerous health issues and being overweight.  Finally, after learning to eat right, exercise, and create good habits in her life with positive thinking and positive people, she included line dancing in her routine for good health.  Though the damage to her joints and organs was not reversible, Lee started to pay attention to her own health, eventually losing approximately 150 pounds in five years.

Where to Find Classes for Line Dancin’ Fun

You can find many classes for line dance instructions just for Senior Citizens at Community Centers, Parks and Recreation Departments, and Church Groups all over America, as well as at classes at dance studios.

If you live in the Eastern part of America, check out the classes available through Step In the Name of Life(TM).  They have classes in at least 32 cities.  Jamie Gant started the first group in Florida so his grandmother would have a place to go to line dance for her health.  After going with her, he was ready to start classes for everyone.  Their goal:  Stepping Away Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure & More(TM).

Source by Renee Benzaim

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