Tag: Injury

It is a known fact that weight training related injuries are on the rise. This is only natural considering the fact that more people are attempting to remain fit now.

The Report in Brief

The report concerning the rise of weight training injuries that published recently (April 16, 2010) is based on Center for Injury Research. Quite a large number of large number of injuries had also been discovered by the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

This study of weight-related increases accounts for cases that occurred from 1990s to 2007. This is a time during which a 50 percent increase in injuries took place.

The largest portion of these injury increases was reported in men ages 13 to 24. Usually it was while using free weights and the majority of these were sprains and strains.

Other injuries included these: Upper body injuries, lower trunk pain, soft tissue injuries, and hand injuries. It should be noted though that even though most of the injuries that occurred in young people 18 to 24 the largest increase in incidences actually took place in people 45 and older.

The reason the older people would get hurt is because they would over-exert themselves. This often is a result of too much lifting and pulling.

There of course is an increase in women participants in weight training too. However, not as much information has yet been provided about female weight trainers.

This is only a short segment of information provided in a report about this issue. Additional information can be found in “Weight Training-Related Injuries Increasing.”

Prevention Tips

This next section is not taken from the same source as the above information about injuries. This is rather a collection of fitness safety tips related to weight training collected from a variety of publications.

There are a variety of reasons why injuries occur. This is a short list of tips based on those varying causes:

Illegal steroids-One main cause of weight training injuries is the use of anabolic steroids. People use them to obtain gains in strength and muscle. However, using steroids is illegal and can lead to torn muscles, tendons, or ligaments. These should NOT be used.

Inadequate warm-up-Another reason that injuries occur is because of not warming up properly. It is highly recommended that you stretch all the major muscles in your legs, arms, back, and abdomen before proceeding.

Inappropriate age-Sometimes adolescents who have not had their muscles fully developed can hurt themselves. Therefore, they should be under close supervision in case of injury. They should limit their weight lifting activity until after reaching puberty.

Improper technique-Sometimes people injure themselves while not using the weights the way they should be used. They also may not handle the weights the way they should be handled. Bouncing, jerking, or throwing them is a very bad idea. Sometimes a person can also extend his/her back in a way he/she should not either, or extending it too often can be dangerous.

Dangerous exercises-Sometimes there are exercises you may have been taught that are not safe. For instance, pull-downs behind the neck can put excessive stress on the neck and shoulders. In this particular case, front/lat pull-downs are recommended instead.

Source by Methuew Hogard

Fitness trackers have quickly become a fixture on the American wrist over the last two years, taking the lion's share of the wearable gadget gift market. Fitbit, the Apple Watch, and a dozen other such gizmos can track not only steps taken, but also blood pressure, heart rate, sleep quality, and more. Fitbit's, in particular, have become increasingly popular because they can help most keep track of their fitness goals and achievements, allowing you to reach those goals easier. When you know how many steps you take through the day and how you are sleeping at night, it becomes a bit easier to lose weight, for example.

Consider:
• One out of six consumers own some type of wearable technology.
• Nearly half of all wearable tech users – 48 percent – are between 18 and 34. While more than two-thirds of 16-to-24-year-olds want wearable tech.
• More men are into the trend than women: 69 percent vs. 56 percent.
• On the financial side, analysts expect the market to grow by 35 percent by 2019.

These fitness trackers are now being used with increasing frequency to support or dispute information used in court cases, including personal injury lawsuits. In 2014, a Canadian judge used information gleaned from a Fitbit to assess the change in lifestyle of an accident victim. Information stored in the accident victim's Fitbit provided evidence that she'd become far less active than she had been before the accident. The data comparison shown:

• The victim took fewer steps per day than before the accident;
• The victim slept less soundly and for fewer hours;
• The victim's overall fitness had declined.

The judge in this case used the Fitbit data to assess the damage the accident inflicted. Experts then fed the data through a larger program called Vivametrica, which compared the plaintiff's information to that of the general population. The judge could then see that the plaintiff was functioning below the average for women in her age group. The fitness tracker offered a tool that provided facts that supported the victim's subjective perception that she had suffered, and the judge was able to evaluate her suffering and award compensation based on objective data.

This sort of information taken from a fitness tracker can potentially help you win a car accident court case if you are severely injured by a driver performing at less than normal for your average driver. As this case demonstrates, the use of fitness tracker technology may affect the outcome of certain personal injury cases depending on the circumstances.

Source by Tara Streff

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