Tag: Age

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Competing in a bodybuilding competition is an exciting, exhilarating and fulfilling experience. It takes determination, dedication and just plain hard work. And, unless you plan on becoming a professional, all you can hope for from all of your effort is a trophy.

Ah, but what a trophy!

When you stand on stage, holding a rigid “relaxed” pose and hear the announcer call your name as Champion in your Class or Winner of the Overall Competition, it’s mighty sweet. You savor the moment and forget all about what it took to get there.

Deciding to Compete

If you are in reasonably good shape and work out regularly, at least four-times-per-week, you can be prepared to enter your first contest within a year. I trained five-days-a-week for 10 months to get ready for my first contest.

You need that much time in order to gain the lean mass your body needs to sustain itself as you enter the fat-burning/cutting phase of your diet, about 13 weeks before your contest. If you want to compete as a Middle Weight, (165 – 185 lbs.), for instance, you might need to be around 195-200 lbs before you begin your cutting phase. The reason is simple. When you go into the cutting phase, your body loses about one pound of muscle for every three pounds of fat. For my first contest, I weighed 154 lbs on January 1st. When I stepped onto the stage on March 19th, I weighed a ripped 136. I was the lightest Bantam Weight. In fact, I was too light. The Bantam Weight limit is 143 lbs. Off season, I will bulk up with lean mass to about 165 lbs and try to come in at around 142.5, near the top of the weight class for next year’s competitions.

So, the first thing you need to do, after deciding to enter a contest, is to pick a contest 10 – 12 months in the future and decide in which weight class you want to compete. Then, see where you are now and where you need to be on contest day. At that point, you can plan your diet.

To make sure this is something you really want to do though, you should attend a bodybuilding competition in your area. It’s the best place to learn about the sport. You can pick out who is really ready to compete and who needs to do more work. Depending on whether you go to a drug-tested show or non-tested show, you will also see how huge some of the men, and even some of the women, who use steroids and other illegal muscle enhancers look. You can decide if that’s the direction you want to go or not.

Competition Diet

Once you decide you want to compete, you must make a complete change in your life style. Bodybuilding is a life-style sport, much like ice skating, marathon running, competitive snowboarding, etc. Bodybuilding takes a lot of time in the gym and a lot of time in the kitchen. Competitive bodybuilders build their lives around their workouts and their meals, which during daylight hours average once every two-and-one-half-hours. It’s also expensive, calling for large amounts of protein each day, at least one gram for each pound of body weight. Here is a typical diet for a bodybuilder who is trying to put on lean mass several months before a competition:

Breakfast: Three egg whites (protein) and one whole egg + one cup of oatmeal

Mid-morning: Protein shake (two scoops) in 8-12 oz of water

Lunch: 8 oz of steak, or chicken, or fish + 8 oz of sweet potato + cup of vegetables

Mid-Afternoon: Protein shake (two scoops) in 8-12 oz of water

Dinner: 8 oz of steak, or chicken, or fish + two cups of vegetables

Throughout the day, you need to drink between 1/2 and one gallon of spring water.

This diet is designed to put on about a pound of lean mass a week. Lots of protein, lots of carbs and little fat.

I’ll talk about how the diet changes as you get closer to your competition later.

Supplements

I said earlier, bodybuilding is an expensive sport. It’s not as expensive as …

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Golf fitness exercises and training can be very beneficial for the mature golfer. There is no doubt the aging process affects the body and in turn adversely effects the golf swing. The aging process decreases mobility, limits flexibility, negates strength, and lowers power outputs. All which are crucial components in the execution of the golf swing.

The good news is there is help: certain steps can be taken to alleviate these symptoms of the aging process. For example, modifications in equipment can help, changes on the mechanics of your swing can be of great assistance, and the implementation of a golf fitness program can be of immense assistance as well. These three steps can assist in returning your swing to a level previously achieved or even improve your game to a level higher than ever before. In order for this to occur, the mature player must remember it is a combination of all three of these parameters; equipment, swing mechanics, and golf fitness training working seamlessly together.

Looking at the golf fitness side of game improvement in your fifties, a few important statistics may provide some relatively to the importance of golf exercises for game improvement. First and foremost, research indicates after the age of 25, the body looses muscle mass at approximately 1% a year. This decreases both the strength and power outputs of the neuromuscular system. If nothing is done to improve both the strength and power outputs of the body by the time an individual is 50 years old they will have lost 25% of their muscle mass.

Why is this statistic important relative to the game of golf?

In order to execute each phase of the golf swing efficiently, the neuromuscular system must have certain levels of strength. This allows the golfer to maintain a fixed spine angle, execute the postural position required in the swing, and generate speed. Basically, a loss of strength equates to the loss of stability in the golf swing affecting every phase of the swing from taking away to finish.

A second component of the aging process relative to the golf swing is mobility and flexibility. Mobility is a combination of both joint range of motion and flexibility. Joint range of motion concerns itself with the actual articular structure of the joint (i.e. skeletal structures), and flexibility has to do with extensibility of muscle tissue surrounding the joint.

The aging process decreases the extensibility of muscular tissues thus causing tightness in the muscular system and decreased mobility in the joint system. Both of these conditions are detrimental to the golf swing. The mechanics of the swing requires mobility within the joint system and flexibility within the muscular system. This allows for the requirement of drawing the club through a large range motion to be met by the body. If mobility is limited and “tightness” exists within the muscular system compensations within the swing will occur in an attempt to execute the mechanics of the golf swing correctly.

It is unfortunate the aging process results in the aforementioned negative affects on the golf swing, but as stated previously, steps can be taken to address such situations and prevent decreased performances on the golf course. These steps on the “physical side” of the equation are contained within a golf fitness program.

A golf fitness program for the mature player will address the negative affects of the aging process through the development of the required levels of mobility, flexibility, stability, strength, and power required to execute the mechanics of the golf swing correctly.

Dissection of this formula for performance improvement through golf fitness training for the mature player breaks down the process into the development of “five physical pillars” within the body. The pillars are as follows: flexibility, balance, strength, endurance, and power. The cohesive development of these physical parameters creates the opportunity of developing sound swing mechanics.

To improve performance, remove physical years from the body, and prevent injury in your game, it is necessary to develop the “five physical pillars” of the swing. Additionally, the golfer must address them on order: beginning with flexibility, moving onto balance, and completing the sequence with power training. Following this suggested progression allows for the …

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Are you facing mid-life feeling sluggish, fatigued and generally overweight? Don’t assume that it’s all downhill from here. You can stay fit and healthy well into old age – if you decide to make some important lifestyle changes. Now is the time to take action!

Ask yourself the following questions:-

  1. Why do some people fare better in old age than others?
  2. Why is it that some people in their 70s and 80s are able to lead a healthy and active life, free from disease, whilst others become frail and dependent on family members?

Could it be down to luck – or does it have anything to do with the lifestyle choices they have made?

It is true that some people may have a genetic disposition to illness that can not be easily prevented. However, the majority of people who suffer from age related illness may not have given enough attention to their overall health, especially during their mid-life years.

Aging has an impact on our health and vitality. We know that at around age 35 our heart rate begins to dip slightly. Between the ages of 47-51 most women begin to experience life changes associated with the menopause. As we progress past our 50s, our memory, balance and muscle mass begin to wane.

Regardless of general ageing, the main cause of many illnesses is largely due to poor diet, harmful levels of stress and a lack of physical and mental exercise. By choosing to change bad mid-life habits into good ones, you can delay or even prevent illnesses like, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and dementia.

Below the age of 40 it is possible, to some extent, to get away with poor lifestyle choices. Excess alcohol intake, smoking and a poor diet are largely compensated for by the youthful body. After 40 though, you need to take greater care of yourself. If you have arrived at age 40, with the belief that it is normal to lose physical fitness and gain weight, then your mindset may encourage what is known as middle age spread. In reality, this is an increase in visceral fat, often linked to high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and strokes.

Research has shown that between the age of 40 and 60, at least two-thirds of the UK population will suffer with some form of chronic health issue, or at least one long-term illness. Yet, to a large degree, many of these diseases can be avoided.

Mid-life is definitely not a downhill course. Instead, it gives you the chance to view life with a more positive outlook. You owe it to yourself to develop a greater chance of having an active and disease-free lifestyle, while living to a ripe old age.

Here are 4 suggestions that you can work on, if you want to avoid the risk of a debilitating disease later in life.

Take care of your teeth and gums – This may seem obvious, but oral hygiene plays a major part in our long-term health, especially as we age. Brushing and flossing after meals can help to prevent inflammation and the buildup of plaque in both the gums and body. Blood vessels which supply blood and oxygen to the heart and brain can become narrowed or restricted when plaque is present in the body. This can lead to a heart attack, stroke or early onset of dementia. Keeping your teeth & gums healthy can significantly improve your health.

Maintain a healthy diet – Ensure that the food you eat has a positive effect on overall health. Always check food labels to ensure products are low in salt, sugar and saturated fats. Foods high in these will raise your bad cholesterol, clog your arteries and increase your risk of diseases. A diet rich in lean protein, fresh fruit, vegetables and oily fish can guarantee you good health. Try to prepare and cook your own meals as often as possible. There are several good cookery books and programmes which show how to make healthy meals within minutes. Drink plenty of water daily and reduce your alcohol intake.

Exercise your mind and body regularly – It is never too late to start taking part …

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