Tag: Book

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In Building Your Enduring Fitness, Lisa Teresi Harris has written the book Baby Boomers and everyone from middle-age to centenarians have been waiting for. We all know exercise and nutrition are important, but all the health and fitness books and exercise programs out there seem to be geared toward the 18-40 age bracket. We all want to feel good long after that, but we may forget how important exercise and nutrition are as we age-not so we can look good at the beach like the younger generation wants, but so we can offset muscle loss, brittle bones, disease, and the belly fat that threatens to make us old before our time.

Harris has been a registered dietitian since 1978. As the owner of Enduring Fitness 4U, she provides senior exercise classes and in-home fitness training and nutrition coaching. As a result, she has the knowledge, skills, and positive mindset to help anyone improve his or her health, activity-level, and overall life satisfaction. She’s helped hundreds of people, and now she shares her lifetime of knowledge with her readers in this new book.

Getting into good shape and being healthy, however, is easier said than done. Some people might even think it’s impossible to slow down the aging process. Many people believe they are fated to be fat because their parents were fat, or to be diabetic, have heart disease, etc. However, research shows that genetics do not always have the final say. For example, Harris quotes a source that states “only about 10% of cases [with Alzheimer’s] carry the defective genes for the disease, and only half of those who carry the genes ever develop it. Most Alzheimer’s cases are caused by cumulative brain damage that occurs during life.” In other words, disability and disease are not inevitable, despite your genes.

For me, this book’s most important message is the need for us to get up and move. Harris asks us whether we are sabotaging our health by the number of hours we sit each day. It’s true we move less with Roombas and smart phone addictions and things delivered to our doors, so she encourages us to find ways we can move more, such as walking while talking on the phone.

And Harris’ results are astounding. She helps people who are prediabetic change their diets. She helps people with walkers regain mobility. She helps seniors strengthen their muscles and improve their balance so they can get up if they fall, and even better, avoid falling altogether. She also encourages people to find activities they enjoy. If you don’t like an activity, you won’t do it, so she shows us how to find our “exercise ecstasy.”

While exercise is important, so is nutrition. Harris gives guidelines for how to get the proper amount of fruits and vegetables into your diet. She offers advice on when to eat protein, how much of it to eat, and how to use it to the greatest benefit. Of course, she’s a big advocate of drinking water.

Many people will find invaluable the series of chapters titled “Building Up Your Defenses Against Chronic Diseases.” Here she talks about heart disease, diabetes, cancer, dementia, arthritis, and osteoporosis and how to improve your chances of not being diagnosed with any of them. She also explores how to live better if you already have them so they don’t impede your enjoyment of life.

One of the biggest challenges for most people is overeating. Harris realizes we are all human and not going to eat vegetables all the time without occasionally indulging. I love her advice on what to do when you go out so you don’t overeat or when you go on one of those cruises where you feel like you’re being held hostage by a breakfast buffet. Despite restaurant servings having increased in size, Harris gives solid advice on how to enjoy eating out without setting yourself back. At the same time, she believes in mindful eating-allowing yourself to enjoy food now and then. For example, she tells us: “Have that yummy ice cream cone when the urge hits; savor every mouthful, and then just move on. (This is an example of mindful eating-paying close attention …

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Combat Conditioning was the first book that introduced me to body weight exercises for functional strength and endurance. I was the type of kid in high school sports that was the proverbial “no talent ass clown.” What I mean by this was that I was very strong but natural talent escaped me. I always vowed that there are people that are much more talented but I would never be out worked. Growing up in the work out craze of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s “Pumping Iron” movie got me into weight lifting with all my friends. Now when you are young and you simple pound out weights to see how strong you are, bad things end up happening. When I received a physical before the starting season of Varsity football, the doctor looked at me and politely said – “Hey idiot, have you ever heard of stretching”? Needless to say the quest began to look for a better way to exercise and gain functional strength. Lawyer Note: I hate these but they are important. With any exercise routines, please check with your Doctor’s to make sure you are able to perform these routines.

Why is this important to me?

This book will help you acquire knowledge on body weight exercises that help in three areas: Strength, Endurance and Flexibility. If these three things are not important to you then please save yourself 5 minutes and shut off the video. Otherwise please continue on with me.

Have you ever seen any of the following: Great MMA fighters, cirque du soleil or a gymnastics competition? All of these phenomenal athletes have functional strength. This means that they can do things with their body that 90 percent of the population cannot. The good news is that 90 percent can do these things if they change up on their exercise routines. Another book you should check out is Convict Conditioning. This focused more on muscle, joint and tendon strength. What is beneficial about that is you can keep that strength well into your seventies.

Don’t get me wrong – any type of exercise is better than none. If you are doing nothing and start doing weight lifting then please keep doing it. But if you want a cheap way to work out with compound results then this book is for you. One big problem with weight lifting by itself is that it utilizes muscle isolation. This means that if you do curling then you isolate the movement to the bicep muscle. This does nothing to create functional strength for your tendons or joints. The human body was engineered to work together so why not shorten your work out and do compound exercises to maximize your results. If you did a simple pull up then you still exercise your bicep but you also engage your back, forearms, shoulders and core along with creating functional strength.

Matt describes his Holy Grail of working out which he coins the Royal Court. I will explain each exercise.

The Hindu squat is an excellent exercise. When you start out you can do a half squat like with your arms in front of you parallel to the floor but as you progress and build up strength in your knees, you will want to do a full squat with the back of your thighs touching the back of your calves.

Strong legs do a body good. When you work on your legs, you engage the whole body and burn calories all day even after the work out. The legs consist of the biggest muscles in your body and it shows the next day when they are sore.

When doing Hindu squats, work up to doing three sets of 100. Doing the royal court in 3 set cycles is a great work out that does not take much time. If you travel then this is a perfect routine because it does not take long at all.

The Hindu pushup is different than a regular pushup. Start with your feet a bit wider than shoulder width apart and your butt in the air. Push through in an arcing motion(similar to downward facing dog in Yoga). Try to work up to 3 sets of 50 repetitions. …

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