Tag: Care

1. Finding The Right Match

Finding the right place for your medical needs is much like finding the right primary care doctor. Feeling comfortable with your physician is a critical step in choosing the right Maui Urgent Care Center. Before you walk in the door, call and ask if you can speak to an available physician. Ask him or her questions about how they handle medical conditions such as, do they take a more traditional approach, or do they recommend alternative treatment options? Once you feel comfortable with their style of care, you’ll feel more confident that you’re choosing the right medical provider. In addition to the style of care, you should also ask how long your physician has lived in Hawaii. The islands are home to very unique organisms that visitors can find themselves allergic to, including flowers like protea, foods such as poi, and marine life like Potters Angel fish and sea fan coral. These rare flora and fauna only exist here or in just a few remote areas in the world, so visitors are unlikely to have had any previous contact with them. That’s why a local physician who understands what to look for and the right questions to ask is crucial to making the right diagnosis so you can get better faster, and back to enjoying your vacation.

2. Accessibility

Maui, and in particular the east side of the island, has many remote areas that are popular visitor destinations but far from the commercial hubs where most urgent care centers are located. For instance, if you were staying at the Travaasa Hotel in Hana, Maui, and needed to visit your nearest urgent care clinic, you’d have drive 4-5 hours to get there, which would result in you missing an entire day of your vacation in paradise. In many cases finding a Maui-based urgent care center that offers telemedicine visits is the best option for accessing medical care. Having the ability to see your Hawai’i-licensed physician from your computer, tablet, or mobile device can save you time and help you quickly decide whether you need to make a trip into the nearest urgent care center or hospital. In most instances, your doctor can fax or call in a prescription to the nearest pharmacy saving you hours of travel time.

3. Affordability

When searching for the right urgent care center in Maui it’s important to ask about payment and coverage options. Many urgent care centers offer only local insurance including HMA, UHA, HMMA or Kaiser Your Choice coverage that can result in a higher out-of-pocket cost for visitors. Calling and asking about coverage before you show up can save you time and money. No insurance? Don’t worry, most walk-in clinics offer a rate for people without insurance — but you’ll want to know up front what those costs are so you can make the most informed healthcare decision.

4. Ask The Experts

Your hotel or timeshare concierge provides a great place to start your urgent care search. They deal with hundreds of visitors and are very familiar the activities that can result in injuries for the under or unprepared, like ocean dives, surf schools, and day hikes in more rugged areas. Consequently, they have relationships with the closest urgent care centers. As soon as you determine that you need care, make your concierge the first stop on your journey to feeling better.

5. Dig Deeper

Once you have a few walk-in care locations in mind, go online and read about experiences other visitors have had. Check sites like Yelp, Google Places, Facebook and the urgent care centers’ websites for customer testimonials and star ratings. Picking a location that has good reviews and clinic pictures will help reduce your anxiety, make a more informed healthcare decision, and result in a better overall medical care experience. 

Source by Norman Estin

Sixty years after India’s independence, despite a “booming” urban economy, 300 million Indians (roughly the size of the USA) still live in abject poverty and one could argue that the biggest price they pay for being poor is their health. While health services in India are generally designed to be inclusive of all people regardless of caste, gender, geographic location, socio-economic status, or any other basis of exclusion, this doesn’t always hold true in practice.

One area where lack of inclusiveness can have especially dire consequences is that of newborn and child health. The country has the unfortunate distinction of claiming 30 percent of the total neonatal deaths in the world. Every year, 1.2 million of the 27 million babies born in India die within the first month of life, according to the latest National Family Health Survey (NFHS-III).

Part of the problem is limited access to hospital and institutional support. In India, 65 percent of all births occur at home, often without the assistance of a skilled birth practitioner. When something goes wrong, there is no one to help and often no plan to get the woman to the local medical center. In rural areas, women often die because transport is not available.

The Indian government has come up with schemes such as the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) and the soon-to-be-launched National Urban Health Mission (NUHM). Both schemes give high priority to the issue of maternal and newborn health for marginalized communities, and seek to improve the availability of and access to quality health care for those at the lowest rung of the socio-economic ladder. Additionally, government programs such as the Janani Suraksha Yojana incentivize delivery in hospitals by encouraging mothers to opt for institutional deliveries.

Unfortunately, in a country of India’s size, many local communities are unaware of these schemes. Those that are aware of the schemes are often confused about the details and how to go about accessing the services. Even more common is the lack of awareness about why these schemes are important in the first place. In many Indian households, where the basic issues of survival take center stage, the health of mothers and their newborns is often sidelined.

Not so in Sabji village in Uttar Pradesh where Ms. Ramvati works. She is a government-sponsored trained Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA). ASHAs are part of an initiative that falls under the NRHM with the aim of bringing communities and health services closer. Ms. Ramvati makes home visits to pregnant women in the village, educating them about safe birthing practices.

She explains that the process of bringing about change has not been easy, but using materials and training provided by a project called Sure Start has eased the way a lot. The project¾a five-year initiative based at PATH, an international not-for-profit organization supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation¾is working with rural communities in Uttar Pradesh and marginalized urban settlements in Maharashtra to help mothers and children survive and stay healthy.

Projects such as these work on the premise of community action and involvement. They work in tandem with the Indian government’s efforts to develop community-level systems for improved services. The goal is to actively engage with the community to bring about change from the inside out.

“Earlier, people were somewhat suspicious and some even forbade me from coming into their houses, but I now receive a lot of respect,” says Ms. Ramvati. “People ask me to sit, offer me tea, and actually listen to what I say.”

Ms. Sudama, a mother of three who is expecting her fourth child, says, “Didi [Ms. Ramvati] comes to our house, and therefore I know how to access a four-wheel vehicle when I need to go to the hospital. I have also kept the telephone number of the doctor handy.” Ms. Sudama’s birth preparation calendar-a gift from Ms. Ramvati-is displayed prominently on her wall.

On another of Ms. Ramvati’s visits, Ms. Sudama was given a tiffin box. While the expectant mother cannot break with the Indian custom of feeding her family first, she now uses the tiffin box to put aside some cooked food for herself and consumes it after everyone else. “I already have three …

The nurse care planning process is an important aid in the treatment of patients. In turn it creates a systematic care plan approach which with the inclusion of other health care professionals allows the patients the best route to full fitness. When used effectively, the nurse planning process offers many advantages to the health care environment:

  • It’s patient-centred, helping to ensure that your patient’s health problems and his response to them are the primary focus of care.
  • It enables you to individualise care for each individual patient.
  • It promotes the patient’s participation in their care, encourages independence and concordance and gives the patient a greater sense of control – important factors in a positive health outcome. (See Putting the ‘P’ in planning.)
  • It improves communication by providing you and other nurses with a summary of the patient’s recognised problems or needs so you all work towards the same goals.
  • It promotes accountability for nursing activities, which in turn promotes quality assurance and quality health care provision.
  • It promotes critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving for the benefits of health care provision.
  • It’s outcome-focused and encourages the evaluation of results.
  • It minimises errors and omissions in care planning.

Basis for the nursing care planning process The nurse care planning process is based on the scientific method of problem-solving, which involves:

  • stating the problem you observed
  • forming a hypothesis about the solution to the problem (‘if… then’ statements)
  • developing a method to test the hypothesis
  • collecting the test data
  • analysing the data
  • drawing conclusions about the hypothesis.

A scientific fact Most people use the scientific method instinctively, without being aware they’re doing it. Simply picking out which pair of shoes best complements your favourite outfit is an exercise in the scientific method. So if you’re familiar with the scientific process, the nursing planning process probably seems familiar. Nursing process steps. The nursing planning process encompasses five steps:

  1. assessment
  2. nursing diagnosis
  3. planning
  4. implementation
  5. evaluation

Following these steps systematically in the order shown here enables you to organise and prioritise patient care in the order that is needed – especially critical for the novice nursing student. It also helps ensure that you don’t skip or overlook important patient information. When used correctly, the nursing planning process ensures that the care plan is revised when new problems arise or patient outcomes remain unmet. It also allows the nurse care plan to be discontinued when patient outcomes have been met.

Source by Iain S Surman

An Elegant System

The vagina isn't just a nice place to own or visit, nor is it merely a passive space awaiting fulfillment; It's a complex, integrated environment. Your vagina is a dynamic system with inherent safeguards in place to maintain a healthy equilibrium despite being susceptible to myriad influences that can alter its state of balance. After all, the vagina is exposed to fluctuating hormones, the consequences of our modern diet, our stress-filled lives and numerous artificial products that nature never intended our delicate tissues to withstand. And, of course, Mother Nature did intend our vaginas to have visitors whose presence and leavings can stimulate and impact our vaginal ecosystem. The vagina is well designed to handle many of these influences but sometimes succumbs leading to imbalance, infection and general grumpiness all around when she's out of commission.

Vaginal Ecology

Vaginal ecology is the study of the environment and its interactions. By understanding the ecology, you can better handle your vagina, and keep her happy and healthy by supporting the natural systems. When, despite your best efforts, the normal balance is disturbed and you get a vaginal infection (vaginitis), knowing how your ecosystem works can give you the power to remedy the situation and restore your environment.

Nice and Normal

A normal vagina is constantly kept moist by its slick, slippery and savory natural discharge. The smell and taste of a healthy vagina is mild, earthy and slightly pungent with a pleasant, musky aroma. It certainly does not smell like fish or have a strong foul odor. A healthy vagina does not smell or taste bad! In fact, it's full of sexy scent plus fabulous pheromones, the chemicals of attraction that we don't consciously smell. Your vaginal juice is a naturally compelling, perfumed invitation.

Juicy Goodness

Vaginal fluid mostly comes from the cells lining the walls, which act similar to sweat glands, producing moisture from the inner mucus membrane surfaces. The rest of the juice is made up of small contribution from several types of glands, located in the cervix and near the vaginal opening. Normal vaginal fluid varies in color from clear to white, although when it dries it may appear yellowish.

The amount differs from one woman to another as well as for the same woman at different times, and ranges from scant to moderate. Some women are naturally wetter or drier then others, just as some people have oily skin or dry hair or sweat more or less profusely.

What's most important for you is to know what's typical for you in amount, color, texture and odor. The vaginal fluid reflects where you are in your cycle, your age, your sexual arousal, hormonal contraceptive use, even your diet and fluid intake. For women who are having normal fertility cycles the shifting pattern should be similar each month. In general, most women are juiciest during the week leading up to and including the day of ovulation. Most women are assess the week before their period. Girls prior to puberty, breast-feeding moms and post-menopausal woman are drier and less varying.

The Vaginal Garden

A healthy vagina is full of friendly bacteria, mainly a particular strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus. These good bacteria protect the vagina and keep it healthy in multiple ways. Their job is to control the population of unfriendly microbes such as yeast and 'bad' bacteria. They do so first by filling up the space, like a garden which is profusely filled with flowers, leaving no space for weeds. Next, the acidophilus maintain the proper vaginal environment by producing two important chemicals: lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide, a liquid form of oxygen. The lactic acid maintains an acid-alkaline balance (known as pH) in the vagina that's acidic. Your helpful bacteria also produce hydrogen peroxide to create an aerobic (oxygenated) environment that discourages bad microbes. The beneficial bacteria are the essential hard-working engineers of the ecology of your vagina. When something causes a shift away from the ideal, they get working to bring your ecology back into line.

Flux and Flow

There are a variety of things that can shift the vaginal equilibrium and swing the system out of equilibrium. To begin with there are the regular changes …

The Difference Between Concierge Medicine and Direct Primary Care

Direct primary care (DPC) is a term often linked to its companion in health care, ‘concierge medicine.’ Although the two terms are similar and belong to the same family, concierge medicine is a term that fully embraces or ‘includes’ many different health care delivery models, direct primary care being one of them.

Similarities

DPC practices, similar in philosophy to their concierge medicine lineage – bypass insurance and go for a more ‘direct’ financial relationship with patients and also provide comprehensive care and preventive services for an affordable fee. However, DPC is only one branch in the family tree of concierge medicine.

DPC, like concierge health care practices, remove many of the financial barriers to ‘accessing’ care whenever care is needed. There are no insurance co-pays, deductibles or co-insurance fees. DPC practices also do not typically accept insurance payments, thus avoiding the overhead and complexity of maintaining relationships with insurers, which can consume as much as $0.40 of each medical dollar spent (See Sources Below).

Differences

According to sources (see below) DPC is a ‘mass-market variant of concierge medicine, distinguished by its low prices.’ Simply stated, the biggest difference between ‘direct primary care’ and retainer based practices is that DPC takes a low, flat rate fee whereas omodels, (although plans may vary by practice) – usually charge an annual retainer fee and promise more ‘access’ to the doctor.

According to Concierge Medicine Today (MDNewsToday), the first official news outlet for this marketplace, both health care delivery models are providing affordable, cost-effective health care to thousands of patients across the U.S. MDNewsToday is also the only known organization that is officially tracking and collecting data on these practices and the physicians — including the precise number of concierge physicians and practices throughout the U.S.

“This primary care business model [direct primary care] gives these type of providers the time to deliver more personalized care to their patients and pursue a comprehensive medical home approach,” said Norm Wu, CEO of Qliance Medical Management based in Seattle, Washington. “One in which the provider’s incentives are fully aligned with the patient’s incentives.”

References and Sources

“Doc This Way!: Tech-Savvy Patients and Pros Work Up Healthcare 2.0”. New York Post. 4/7/2009.

Who Killed Marcus Welby? from Seattle’s The Stranger, 1/23/2008

“Direct Medical Practice – The Uninsured Solution to the Primary Medical Care Mess” with Dr. Garrison Bliss (Qliance Medical Group of WA).

“Direct Primary Care: A New Brew In Seattle”. Harvard Medical School – WebWeekly. 2008-03-03.

DPCare.org

Qliance.com

ConciergeMedicineToday.com

Source by Michael Tetreault

"Position the organization to compete on value: it is the new reality."

– National Committee for Quality Healthcare, Pay for Performance PPT Primer (2006)

Most health care professionals would say that providing value – high quality care, timely delivery and patient satisfaction – is their mission. Yet, positioning a health care organization to compete based on the value of its services is a relatively new idea, and one whose time has come – that is, depending on whom you ask.

Many payers are in favor of linking some portion of provider payments to quality and efficiency metrics. As of 2006, more than half the HMOs in the United States offered such "Pay for Performance" provider contracts. Given that in excess of 15 percent of the nation's gross domestic product is now spent on health care insurers are hoping that Pay For Performance (P4P) plans will make patients healthier and ultimately reduce the cost of health care.

Health care consumers also appreciate being able to compare physicians and facilities when making decisions about where to seek care. Unfortunately, P4P measurements of hospitals and health care providers have yet to be standardized, which can be confusing to someone trying to compare reviews from different sources.

Despite these challenges, health care appears to be moving in the direction of consumer-driven selection. As a result, the industry is increasing its measurement of results and its adherence to guidelines. However, in order to compete in this new market, physicians, hospitals, laboratories and other health care organizations must do more than simply measure their processes and report on results. They must demonstrate improvement in these areas over time.

For healthcare organizations, viable and sustainable improvement requires three things:

1. An established system that can be applied to any process, clinical or administrative, to positively impact outcomes and metrics.

2. A methodology that is easily transferable, so health care professionals can learn to apply it to their own processes as they help patients.

3. A common language that drives the process of improvement but is flexible enough to be adapted to the specific culture of each organization.

While P4P provides a venerable stick to grow by, it remains to be seen whether it provides the means to grow. In contrast, a well-designed Performance Excellence program, based on a proven methodology such as Lean Six Sigma, can help health care providers realize dramatic and long-lasting improvements in the areas measured measured by P4P metrics: safety, efficacy, timeliness, efficiency , equality and consumer focus.

Most importantly, Performance Excellence and Pay for Performance share the same goal: to provide high quality patient care with the best possible outcome at the lowest cost. Whether this objective is labeled a value proposition, a mission statement, or just the way health care should be, it's a goal that providers, payers and patients can all support.

Source by Debra Jennings

Whether you are just starting a home healthcare agency or have been in business for years, there are several features to keep in mind when evaluating home healthcare software. Below are the top ten features to look for in a HHC software:

1. Intake Management. Look for software that is able to quickly admit and process new patients as well as keep a running history of past patient episodes.

2. Billing. It is not necessary to hire a billing consultant when you choose a home healthcare software with a built-in billing module. Make sure the software supports Medicare, Medicaid, Wellcare and private payers.

3. Scheduling. Most software packages include scheduling but not all of them automatically schedule caretakers according to their availability. Your chosen software should automatically account for travel time, vacation days and sick leave.

4. Customized Payroll System. Look for a software package that offers a customized payroll system so you can easily change pay rates, payroll methods (i.e. pay per visit, per hour or per unit), location rates and third party providers.

5. Point of Care. Some software vendors offer this POC feature and others don’t. It is a very useful feature that allows your caregivers to enter visit notes via a web-browser and send them to your office. The Point of Care feature should work on all portable devices and communicate with the main software.

6. POC 485 Forms. The software needs to be able to print your 485 forms on a standard printer.

7. OASIS Management. Corrections and inactivations should be supported in this module, as well as OASIS validation and electronic submitting capabilities.

8. Outlier Management. With this tool you can proactively manage and control the impact of outlier cases. Most outlier modules offer a PPS calculator.

9. Reports. When you are evaluating the reporting feature on your prospective software, ask how many reports are available. Also find out if the reports, especially those for your patients, are translated in different languages.

10. Narrative Builder. This feature is not offered in most software packages but is extremely convenient. The reason is that instead of having to type standard answers, you can choose answers from a library. Look for a builder with a search function and one that allows you to create your own answers.

In addition to the features above, you are going to want a user-friendly Admissions module that allows you to easily process the in-take and discharge of patients.

When you are evaluating the technology behind the software, make sure it does not require a digital certificate, modem or VPN to submit claims to Medicare. Also, choose a software that is web-based.

Ask the software company if they provide free training and technical support. Also ask how much installation fees are. Lastly, ask for a demonstration so you can see all of the features in action.

Source by Luciano Lapaz

Nowadays, a large number of people are entering home health care jobs. They are getting into these jobs because some people are experiencing a hard time taking care of their older loved ones. This is why they end up looking for home health care nurses that can do their duties instead.

There are many ways to find a home care assistant. Most of the time, home health care employees are found directly or via home care agencies. These agencies usually have staff like nurses and social workers that can cater to your needs. On the other hand, employing an independent home health care assistant is more effective because it gives you more power over the kind of assistance you want.

You should properly screen your prospect home care employee is he or she has sufficient training, personality and qualifications. You should completely discuss the needs of the senior recipient during the interview. It is also important for both of you to have a written copy of the job description and the nature of expertise you are searching for.

Before you employ the person, he or she should be knowledgeable and skilled with the following home health care services:

1. General health management including the giving or applying of medication and other medical care treatments.

2. Personal care like dressing, bathing, oral hygiene and shaving.

3. Nutrition assistance including the preparation of meals, feeding and even grocery shopping.

4. Household chores like dishwashing, laundry, and light housework.

5. Companionship like reading books and newspaper or taking the senior on walks.

It is also important to let the employee fill out an application form with the following details: full name, phone number, address, date of birth, educational background, social security number and work history. You can also ask them for a copy of their senior health care certificate and any valid ID like social security card and driver’s license.

These are the basic things you should require and conduct once you offer home care jobs. With these, you would get a qualified and reliable health care assistant. This way, you are assured that the senior will be cared for effectively and satisfactorily.

Source by Ian H

My first encounter with Rudolph Ballentine was during my early 2000 naturopathic training at Clayton College of Natural Health. The book was Radical Healing, and it transformed my way of thinking about illness and healing. 600 pages of knowledge and experience opened my eyes to the promise of holistic thinking.

Rudolph Ballentine was trained at Duke University in Psychiatry; He later created and now directs the Center for Holistic Medicine in New York City. He is one of the great contemporary standard bearers for healing traditions as old as mankind. Ballentine tells us that suppressing of symptoms is folly, true healing is profoundly transforming, and deep healing is reorganizing deep inner patterns in mind and body.

Reading Ballentine I am reminded that the history of the natural healing arts is replete with men and women with vision and courage, that Ballentine's Radical Healing is not new but centuries old. Wrapping our minds around that concept is difficult because in modern times the word "new" is just a way of framing what has always been.

There is something about the use of natural medicine that has a tendency to bring us back into harmony with the rest of nature. The idea of ​​practice is to heal by bringing all of the pieces back into a cohesive package of spirit, mind and body

Ballentine is a true wonder in natural health practice, he has written a number of books, is a physician, psychiatrist, herbalist, Ayruvedic practitioner, homeopath, and teaches all of these techniques, Dr. Ballentine is a model for the health practitioner of the future.

Books: Radical Healing, Integrating the World's Great Therapeutic Traditions to Create a New Transformative Medicine (2000) Science of Breath, a Practical Guide (2007) Yoga and Psychotherapy, the Evolution of Consciousness (with Swami Rama) (2007) Rudolph Ballentine is a great modern natural health guru. I appreciate his life and work.

Source by Bill Tallmon

Unlike the vast majority of the world, the United States treats health, using a narrower perspective, and focuses exclusively, on what is referred to, either as Conventional Medicine, or alleopathic. This approach depends, largely on using a chemical approach, including prescription drugs, and over – the – counter (OTC) ones. In most other nations, the widespread approach, is combining, alleopathy, with a combination of alternative methods, including homeopathy, aromatherapy, Reiki, etc. This is often referred to as a Wellness approach to health care, etc, and is based on differentiating between methods and methodologies, and focuses on treating symptoms, by considering their causes, etc, rather than on, merely treating symptoms. With that in mind, this article will attempt to briefly review, consider, and examine, and discuss, the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives, and how, balancing both, and using the most beneficial components, of each, might make a lot of sense.

1. Conventional method: Most of us are used to the conventional medical approach and treatments. This begins with inoculations, as children, which continue, throughout our lives. The interesting thing, is vaccines are, in fact, based on the philosophy of homeopathy, because we inject a very small quantity of the disease, etc, in order to develop a resistance to it, and, thus an immunity against certain illnesses, etc. In the United States, we often treat illnesses and sicknesses, by using chemical medications, which cover up, and temporarily eliminate the underlying symptoms, but, often, witness, what is referred to, as bounce – back, which means, the particular illness returns. However, when it comes to life – threatening illnesses and diseases, such as cancers, certain blood disorders, etc, conventional medicines, are often, the best option. However, even then, the treatment is often, more effective and humane/ comforting, when combined with using alternative treatments. For example, antibiotics are generally far better tolerated, when we also take probiotics. Many calmatives, etc, make these treatments, more effective and worthwhile.

2. Alternative approaches: Pain, discomfort, and many other ailments, when not life – threatening, or demanding more aggressive treatments, are eased, and/ or relieved, using acupunture. This ancient Chinese treatment, uses what is known an Meridians, to determine, the best way to proceed. I have personally taken advantage of these treatments, and found them, non – intrusive, and helpful. Homeopathy is based on introducing a minute amount of a particular disease, in a specific way, in order to build up our own immune system. This is non – intrusive, with no side effects, and I have also found these helpful, but, the advantage is, either they’ll help or not, but do no harm. Others have found comfort in many other alternative treatments, such as aromatherapy, herb therapy, etc.

3. Wellness therapy: Doesn’t it make sense, to begin with the non – invasive, alternative therapies, especially for minor ailments, and then use conventional medicines, when needed, necessary, and indicated?

We need to open our minds, and think beyond the conventional. After all, isn’t the objective of health care, maximizing a healthy life and living?

Source by Richard Brody

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