Tag: Change

Mental Fitness Challenge: 90 Days to Change

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I have read hundreds of examples recently where people have taken a 90 day challenge to improve the physical fitness and I love it! What better way to get in physical shape than partner with a community of like-minded individuals? However, with all the focus on a physical challenge, aren’t people missing out on two other key aspects of fitness – the mental and spiritual sides?

If people are going to challenge themselves anyway, why not launch a 90 day total mental fitness challenge? Work on all three areas of life by improving one’s physical, mental, and spiritual sides. For example, just as flabby muscles must be worked out in order to tone and strengthen, so too does flabby thinking. In fact, if anything, flabby thinking can have more disastrous effects in a person’s life than flabby muscles. Therefore, if a person is investing energy for 90 days anyway, then make it a total transformation, not just a physical one.

A person’s thought life changes when he begins to feed on a steady diet of positive books, audios, and association with others who do the same. Indeed, I know of no other activity than can change a person’s life as fast as changing his associations. Birds of a feather, in other words, do flock together. My good friend, the late Charlie “Tremendous” Jones, used to say, “Five years from now you will be pretty much the same as you are today except for two things: the books you read and the people you get close to” It was eighteen years when I first heard Charlie’s words and took his advice. It changed everything.

Fitness experts say that 85% of physical fitness is in proper dieting. I believe the same principle holds true for mental and spiritual dieting as well. Tell me the thought diet a person routinely feeds his mental and spiritual sides and I can fairly accurately predict his five year future. Success is that predictable; however, it isn’t that easy.

Why not? Because the right habits, although easy to do, are also easy not to do. Left to themselves, most people will choose the path of least resistance, which means continuing in their bad habits rather than changing. The good news, however, is that through associating with others in a 90 day challenge, a person can leverage the community to help drive his personal change. In essence, community is the difference between good intentions and good results. Many will give up on themselves, but fewer are willing to give up on others who are counting on them.

Fortunately, it only takes three steps for a person to change everything:

1. Develop a proper diet for the food and thoughts entering his body and mind.

2. Make commitments to himself and others to follow the new diet for 90 days.

3. Maintain association with others who have committed to do the same thing.

There it is. A recipe for success in any area of life. It’s been said that a person changes when the pain of staying the same or the joy of changing becomes big enough. Eighteen years ago, I took Charlie “Tremendous” Jones up on his mental fitness challenge and it has made all the difference for me. I share this with the readers to encourage them in the three step process for real change. Are you ready to take the mental fitness challenge?

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Source by Orrin Woodward

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One of the craziest things about the fitness industry these days is how everything is geared to make exercise easier, instead of helping you to get in shape.

A while back I took a looksy in this new mega fitness club that had just opened, and when I walked onto the main exercise floor I thought I had accidentally stumbled into the testing facility for The Kennedy Space Center.

I had never seen so many machines and widgets in my entire life that would supposedly help me gain muscle and burn fat.

They had cardio equipment that allowed you to surf the web while you were on it, and workout machines that even kept track of your weight and reps for you…no lie.

Most of the equipment required you to sit down to use it, and each machine had multiple seat and lever adjustments, as well as a giant plastic sign with full instructions written on it.

I jumped on a few of the different pieces and banged out a couple sets each for about 15 minutes, but quickly grew bored with the limitations that they placed on me.

The problem with these gizmos is that they all isolated different bodyparts; one machine was for my biceps, another for core exercise, another for my pecs, and so on.

If all I had cared about doing was pumping up different bodyparts for purely cosmetic enhancement, I guess the machines would have been fine.

But I believe that this is one of the major setbacks for most of the people that workout in a regular health club.

You are being led like rats on a wheel, being told that this is how you should train, that machines are “safer” than free weights and just as effective.

You move from machine to machine, pumping up each bodypart individually, and then go run on a treadmill or an elliptical for an hour.

The problem here, boys and girls, is that none of this type of training is actually preparing you for real life, day-to-day activities.

It’s building “fake” muscles…toned, yeah, but unprepared for real athletic endeavors and leaving you prone to injury.

Think about this.

Most activities happen to you while you’re on your feet, and usually involve multiple muscle groups working simultaneously whilst doing things like bending, turning, twisting, running, etc.

For example, I’m thinking back to the day after Halloween last year, when I had to pick up and put away eight storage bins full of decorations weighing about 60-80 pounds each.

Let me tell you, no amount of measly isolation exercises on a machine would have prepared me for the amount of effort involved, or the stress on my back.

I had to not only hoist these up from the floor to shoulder level, I also had to press them above my head and twist my whole body 90 degrees to get each bin into its proper cubicle in my garage.

Whereas isolation training works individual bodyparts instead of preparing the body to work as a unit, most people who would have found themselves in my situation would have ended up with a tweaked back as a result of their inadequate training regimen.

So what’s the answer?

You need to train differently.

The type of training that will benefit you the most are exercises that require you to balance and coordinate, as well as challenging your strength, speed, flexibility and stamina.

You need to forget about what’s trendy and instead focus on what works.

You need to start training like a warrior, because every day, in a way, you ARE going into battle.

That battle consists of the strain being caused to your back and neck from sitting at a desk looking at a computer and watching reality shows and sports and DVD’s for long hours.

It consists of long commutes to work, and traffic jams and heavy traffic, all sapping your energy and making your muscles weak from disuse.

And lastly, there’s the stress of trying to be a great parent, boss, employee, son, daughter, and friend, all at the same time, every day.

E-mailing someone while you’re walking on a treadmill doesn’t make you better at time management, …

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