Tag: Community

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The leading cause of death in the US according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC.gov) is Cardiovascular disease. CPRGlobalAcademy.com is committed to teaching useful techniques for saving lives. It is important to remember that Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be applied in many ways. If a person has drowned, had a heart attack, had a stroke, went into cardiac arrest or is choking proper training could be the difference between life and death of the patient. If the patient is not breathing, is unconscious or has no pulse CPR should be applied immediately. Always remember proper CPR begins with chest compressions.

It is important to note that death is most likely to occur after 10 minutes of loss of oxygen to the brain. From 6 to 10 minutes brain damage is expected. From 4 to 6 minutes brain damage is very possible and from 0 to 4 minutes brain damage is virtually non-existent.

Understanding CPR

When the heart stops beating blood stops flowing throughout the body. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is when one person performs chest compressions and breathing into a patient who does not have pulse or who is not breathing. Chest compressions combined with breathing into the patient will carry the now oxygenated blood throughout the body and into the brain. CPR acts like an artificial heart moving the blood rich in oxygen into the brain.

If CPR is performed on the patient the chances of survival increases and continues to increase if the AED is applied and if medical help arrives within ten minutes.

Any persons who assist those who are injured, ill or in peril are protected by the Good Samaritan Law. As long as they're acting voluntary, without expectation of reimbursement or compensation while performing such aid, on site-they'll have legal protection. Remember, when performing CPR every second counts so, unless required otherwise, don't hesitate to call 911, perform CPR or external chest compressions immediately.

Before you attempt CPR upon a patient there are several things you must do. Make sure you and / or the patient aren't in any danger-if possible, resolve the danger and if not, move the victim out of harms way. If unable to, for whatever reason, immediately call 911.

Check the patient and see if he / she is conscious or not. Do not check for a pulse because time is of the essence and finding a pulse can take too much time. Call out to the patient asking, "Are you okay?" Repeat if necessary, and if the patient does not respond, immediately call 911 and then perform CPR-initiating Circulation, Airway and Breathing Tasks (the CA-B's) and not the AB-C's. Also, if possible have someone else call 911 and begin CPR, immediately.

It's important to note: that the latest 2010 AHA guidelines recommends in-confident performers should, at least, perform chest compressions upon the patient, since studies show chest compressions can be as effective as the combination of CPR.

C is for Circulation – Adult Compressions

Circulation – chest compressions circulate the blood within the patient. It's important to place your hands correctly upon the patient's chest. To do so, find the point where both halves of the patient's ribs meet, interlock your fingers and with the palm of your hand, you'll compress. It's important to kneel beside the patient while doing so, for maximum compression. Once in position, lock your elbows and use your body's weight to compress 2 inches upon the patient's chest. Compress again, once the chest inflates back into position. A ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths (30: 2) is the recommended amount while compressing 100 times a minute. Remember, you should administer CPR until help arrives.

A is for Airway – Clear the airway

Airway – Make sure the patient is on a solid surface (on the backside). Next, kneel next to the patient's neck and shoulders. Open the patient's airway by tilting the head back with the palm of one hand while gently lifting the chin with the other hand. For no more than 10 seconds, check for life: listen for any sounds, put your cheek next to the patient's mouth to feel any breaths while also looking for any motion. If the patient …

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Fitnesscasting is the commercial application of podcasting for the personal fitness industry. Fitnesscasting is the distribution and publishing of audio and video feeds, that offer personal health and fitness training and information delivered over the Internet, for on demand listening.

This is a new step in the evolution of on-demand health and fitness information delivery, making it accessible, informative, useful and appealing. This mix presents the health and fitness industry with a very unique opportunity to reach its audience through this new medium. Those individuals, who are already seeking health and fitness information actively, will use RSS subscription technology built into each podcast feed, to receive information immediately as it is updated by each organization. With one click of a button, a user can subscribe to a feed that may be interesting, and any related information that is ever updated to that feed will be automatically processed to their personal aggregator. An aggregator is able to subscribe to a feed, check for new content at user-determined intervals, and retrieve the content.

To take this process one step further, podcasting publishes each feed with the capability to be transferred to any portable audio or video device. So with the growth of the ipod and all the other portable media devices, you have the ability to grab fitnesscasts and place them on your portable player for listening or viewing. Most users attach their portable players to their computers daily or weekly, and once the player is attached they automatically receive the new Fitnesscast updates.

The flexibility of this medium is what will drive the growth of Fitnesscasting tremendously over the next few years. There are numerous formats that can be used in developing a fitnesscast. Audio and video workouts give the power to the listener or viewer to receive on-demand health and fitness training. In addition, podcasts are being placed on portable video devices to offer exclusive training workouts for those clients who may travel a lot, or want to workout in the comfort of their home or on their own schedule.

The best thing about fitnesscasting is that the opportunities are endless. Here are some examples of how podcasting will benefit the fitness industry. Most Americans have heard of 6 minute abs or the home jazzercise videos, in fact, these have sold extremely well in our society. With as busy as people are in today’s society, some individuals do not have the opportunity to make it to a gym as much as they would like. However, these same individuals are not looking to give up their workout routine, they just need it custom fitted to their likings. With fitnesscasting, you have the ability to utilize this medium on-demand at the convenience. In addition, with audio and video ipods you can take these fitnesscasts with you when traveling.

Another example of its use could be in large scale gyms. All gyms have trainers who help their patrons’ workout and develop their bodies, yet, sometimes there are either not enough trainers or time schedules do not match up. With fitnesscasting, you have an audio or video of a trainer giving you instruction, at the touch of your fingers and on your time schedule.

The options are wide open for the development of fitness programs that are cutting edge, and highly opportunistic in terms of converting listeners and users into consumers and revenues.

The popularity of portable on demand information will grow even greater as wireless internet services continue to flourish across the country. These portable devices will no longer have to be connected to the internet; they will receive information wirelessly as it is updated. In addition, as cell phones and portable devices continue to merge together, the market grows larger.

For organizations that have members worldwide, the distribution of company information is very important, and once again this offers each institution a method of on-demand delivery which is convenient to all.

There are numerous uses for Fitnesscasting, and over the next few years it will explode in popularity. It is beneficial to organizations as well as the consumer, and it will be seen as a great tool in any health and fitness organizations’ operations.

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Source by Ryan Matthew Hoback

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Many of our communities have been involved with Community Needs Assessments, Community Health Needs Assessments, Community Economic Development Plans, and ongoing planning for the built environment. All of these planning lenses are helpful ways to look at communities, and build for the future. One of the most important lenses to use for community planning for the next 10 to 20 years is the projected impact of aging on our communities, counties and states. What will is mean for a state to move from being 39th in proportion of older adults in 2010, to being 4th by 2030? What does it mean for a county to have a population shift that includes an increase of older adults by over 100% in the next 10 years, along with a projected reduction of people under 40 years old?

Understanding the Demographic Trend

The demographic trend has been called by many names, such as the "Age Wave," or "Silver Tsunami," with arguments in meetings and on blogs about whether those terms are helpful or pejorative, descriptive or ageist. In addition, some people find the terms "elderly" difficult, while others find "seniors" to be patronizing. Once people have dealt with parsing the grammatical minefield, then the most important issues are to understand both the demographic trend and other substantive factors.

Although a few in the field indicate that the aging of the population is rather slow and easily absorbed, the vast majority of experts agree that this is a significant, fast-moving trend that will not be easily absorbed. Research I've conducted has covered everything from future health professional shortages and health system gaps to the built environment, funding and policy trends. The potential impact of the aging of our population on communities and states is significant. It will require proactive, sustained responses at community, state and national levels.

Some communities and states are better positioned to respond to this trend than others.

Impact Also Depends on a Few Other Key Factors

The ability of groups to effectively respond depends upon a number of other key factors. Although the demographic trend is the primary issue, other important factors impacting our ability to respond include the following:

  • Overall community health;
  • Poverty levels, average and median incomes (especially for middle aged and elderly);
  • Local municipal budgets, economic ratings, and taxing capacity;
  • Legislation, policies, and funding related to both aging and community development;
  • Regional infrastructure and built environment.

The impact of the demographic trend is also shaped by the state of community and regional planning already in place to deal with the impact of aging upon our communities. Leadership and citizen engagement are also important factors that could help drive and mobilize initiatives. Leaders can and should respond. The issues are complex, but not overwhelming. However, they need to be addressed proactively.

How a Social Calculator can Predict the Potential Impact of Aging for Communities and States

Many of these factors have been analyzed by our team through a number of aging related research and planning projects over the past few years. We are now completing an Aging Social Impact Calculator that can provide an initial scan of the local environment, and the state environment. It looks at key factors that shape a county's or state's social, economic, and community health.

Research projects that I've recently completed demonstrate that the Social Determinants of Health, health rankings, economic benchmarks and policy issues either help communities and states to move forward, or serve as additional challenges.

Social Determinants . The Social Determinants shape us as individuals, families and communities. They include things such as family income, jobs, poverty and financial assets. Income, assets, poverty, and unemployment have been demonstrated to be some of the most important shapers of family and community health, health disparities, and health equity. Race and ethnicity have been seen as extremely important by the World Health Organization, US federal government bureaus, and the health research and funding community. Individual, family and community educational levels are also significant. Taken together, or aggregated, one finds community snapshots that reflect the local economy, jobs and poverty; racial and ethnic mix; and educational levels. They help to predict how our lives will be shaped in the future.

Community and State

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