Tag: Dead

[ad_1]

In a new work supported by USA Triathlon (USAT), the governing body for triathlon and related multi-sport competitions, eighteen senior world champion triathletes offer bright-side strategies for minimizing frailties and maximizing possibilities for wellbeing, particularly exuberance, physical fitness, mental acuity, happiness and joy, meaning and relevance.

A treasure trove of 66 uncommon but plausible tips that, if practiced, should make life better (healthier), more enjoyable and more attractive. Not Dead Yet seeks to render getting older less daunting and more appealing for all who are, or want to be old someday, though not too soon!

Not Dead Yet provides what you must know about aging and thriving but may have been too polite or nervous to ask, not realizing that thriving at this stage of life was a realistic option. The focus of this work is upon positive, largely under-appreciated opportunities that can make the later years the best of times, by far. The humor and wit of the accomplished perennial triathletes, the eloquent words of Robert Green Ingersoll throughout and chapters on REAL wellness, frailty and death, meaning and purpose, epiphanies, fun, staying relevant and what’s left should appeal to readers of all ages.

The focus of Not Dead Yet is different from books on aging which overwhelmingly focus on medical advice oriented to frailties, illnesses and the looming presence of death, not successful adaptation to older age. The tips and other material in Not Dead Yet complement sound medical counsel, particularly with respect to the prevention of the usual difficulties, but the difference is dramatic because the focus goes beyond coping to exuberant living. Not Dead Yet tips represent an upbeat message; the commentaries do not focus on the dark side of aging. The participating champions don’t deny any of it, but they don’t dwell upon any of it, either.

While much valuable information about the difficult facts and dynamics of aging is common knowledge, the absence of the positive side of being in or near the retirement years tends to discourage older populations, not encourage positive actions that will improve health status. The emphasis in this book is on action – forward-moving attitudinal and behavioral advice.

In short, Not Dead Yet is wholly designed to foster proactive health-enhancing actions that add wellbeing and enjoyment beyond the absence of discomfort, limitations and suffering. The challenges of aging are well known, especially those dealing with negative changes physical and mental. The tips embrace the bright side of senior life, practical ways to bring a bit of Spring and Summer to the Fall of existence.

Readers will surely enjoy and act upon the words of wisdom from these senior champions and ponder their many recommended steps for success at aging. These writers want you to make the most of opportunities associated with being mature, wiser than ever and perhaps retired with more time to do what you want to do, with whom and when in ways you prefer to go about it. Elder life situations are rich with under-appreciated possibilities to do more while complaining and suffering less.

The ideas on aging comport with something the great American 19th century orator Robert Green Ingersoll (1833-1899) said of happiness, namely, that the time to be happy is now, the place to be happy is here and the way to be happy is to make others so. While we cannot directly make others happy, we can and are seeking, with Not Dead Yet, to provide sparkling tips and commentaries that will brighten the time remaining for all readers. We believe we can do this to some extent by inciting action on the part of readers to do more that can readily be done to enjoy good health and happiness, love and joyful living in the time remaining.

[ad_2]

Source by Donald Ardell

[ad_1]

Now, before you go crazy on me… hear me out.

I’ve been in the health and fitness industry (more specifically health clubs) for a while now and I really have to say that if I were to start a club from scratch… I wouldn’t include an aerobic program at all.

Why?

Because I’ve never REALLY seen these programs work.

Sure, I’ve seen people start to drop weight with step aerobics, but they tend to plateau extremely quickly and plateaus lead to frustration. Frustration leads to doubt and doubt leads to failure.

Studies have shown that aerobic activities can burn away valued muscle AND have shrinking effects on the heart and lungs. Now, of course I’m not taking about aggressive cardiovascular routines that truly challenge the body.

No, what I’m referring to are the activities that try to “put” you in a certain target rate… you know… the vaunted “fat burning” zone.

Listen to this:

Yes, it is true that your body burns more calories from fat when you are operating at a certain effort level like what is experience when most people are involved in activities like step aerobics.

However, what you truly miss out on are the “afterburn” effects that other types of exercises can provide. Most people lose any and all the benefits of a heightened metabolism within 30 minutes of finishing a step aerobic workout. Compare that to the 72 hour lift in metabolism that interval training and weight training can provide and you can now start to understand why many of the people that are actually on the workout floor subjecting themselves to more grueling workouts look and feel better than their “step aerobic” counterparts.

I’m sure you’ve seen all of the step aerobic DVD’s and tapes that go on sale in places like Walmart or even on TV…

Don’t waste your money.

Most people only do these tapes for a short amount of time and then they quit.

Why?

No results… it’s too convenient… it gets stale… etc.

Remember, your body is an INCREDIBLE assembly of systems and it’s ability to adapt to any given stimulus is quite remarkable. That being said, the other downfall of step aerobics is that you are always doing the same routines over and over again and you adapt.

Adaptation = NO RESULTS

There is one good thing about step aerobics though…

Most step aerobic classes are VERY SOCIAL and this social atmosphere actually helps people to continue their workout programs.

I like social programs and working out… the right social program properly formatted will give you incredible results.

Unfortunately, step aerobics really doesn’t fit the bill of what I would consider “proper formatting”.

[ad_2]

Source by Brad Howard

Back to top