Tag: Drinking

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Water boiled before drinking it is one of the recommended practice by health officers especially in the third world countries where their source of drinking water is not safe and sometimes the causes for some incidence of common illness for children.

Those living in the remote areas, in the farms and far flung barrios are the one victims of these infectious diseases of catching water-borne diseases because of drinking unsafe water.

To ward-off the impending occurrence of water-borne diseases, boiling your drinking water is the safest way. Study shows, that water boiled for three minutes kills bacteria, including disease-causing organisms and giardia cysts. However, boiling concentrates inorganic impurities such as nitrate and sulfates. Water that undergoes heating process also tastes flat because the carbon dioxide is removed.

In the most advanced countries, drinking water is safe and they’re already treated to meet International Safety Standard, not like in the poor countries that they’ve to dwell on making some innovation just to give safe drinking water to its populace.

And heating their water before drinking is only the best alternatives.

8 Advantages

1. Kills some bacteria, viruses, cysts and worms.

2. The simplest and easiest method of disinfecting to remove pathogens from the water.

3. Removes some microorganisms and some chemicals and other components that can be present in drinking water.

4. Effective in destroying several classes of waterborne pathogens like; bacterial spores, fungi, protozoan, and helminth ova.

5. No need for a skills training in boiling water as long as it is boiled at the right heating temperature to kill waterborne diseases.

6. It is safe as against the fresh tap water.

7. Drinking boiled water everyday increases your blood circulation.

8. Some studies suggests that by drinking hot water, removes some built deposits in our nervous system. These deposits are responsible for creating negative thoughts and emotions.

There are still lots to learn about the importance of boiling water for the safety of our body against some major diseases that caused illness to some people especially children and adults who are vulnerable by drinking unsafe water.

Source:Adapted from Sobsey, 2002;Skinner and Shaw, 2004;WHO, 2004a, P. Laurent, et al. Household Drinking Water Systems and their Impact on People with Weakened Immunity, MSF-Holland, Public health Depart, Eubank, Wanda, et al. Univ. of Missouri Extension.

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Source by Crisologo Ramasasa

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Most Indians have close encounters of the culinary kind with Fenugreek or methi seeds very early in life. These seeds are remarkably bitter and have a marvellous aroma when roasted or fried in a little oil.

How did we start using these seeds, bitter as they are?

Fenugreek down history lane

Apparently, in the 1st century AD, the Romans flavoured wine with fenugreek. The use of fenugreek /methi in India is probably older than history itself; the leaves and the seeds of the herb are well entrenched in Indian cuisines from all parts of the country.

In West Bengal, for instance, methi seeds are used as ‘paanch phoron,’ one of five spices that are used to temper dishes. In fact, the aroma of these little mustard-coloured cuboids makes them a popular choice for the tempering of dals and chutneys. Methi seeds are also used whole or powdered in sambar powder in South India, and pickles in all parts of India.

Modern miracle seed

Fenugreek seeds were always around in Indian kitchens and traditional medicine cabinets. But in recent times, there has been a steady stream of information about the health benefits of fenugreek seeds as many people have ‘adopted’ this seed and reaped health benefits.

The most popular way of consuming fenugreek seeds is to boil them in water. This softens the seeds and releases their nutrients. It also reduces their extreme bitterness so that they are easier to chew and swallow. This requires a little getting used, of course, but the benefits far outstrip the initial distaste.

Fenugreek in water

Soaking fenugreek in water is recommended because it has water soluble minerals and fibre.

There are two ways to make methi/fenugreek water:

Soak 2 tablespoons of fenugreek seeds in 2 glasses, about 400ml, of water overnight.

Put 2 tablespoons of fenugreek seeds in a flask at bedtime. Add 2 glasses of boiling water into the flask. Screw on the lid. Let the seeds soak the whole night. Drink the water first thing in the morning. Chew up the seeds and swallow.

The second method is convenient and healthier. Of course, the seeds are bitter, but you will get used to it. After all, coffee and tea are bitter too; yet we drink them with devotion!

Health benefits of drinking ‘fenugreek water’:

Very beneficial to people with diabetes: Fenugreek encourages the slower absorption of sugars and also stimulates insulin. Diabetics and people on the borderline of diabetes will reap many benefits in drinking warm fenugreek water. Fenugreek seeds can also be powdered and added to dishes like idlis and dosas.

Aids digestion: Fenugreek seeds have mucilage, and the soaking process makes them mucilaginous. They coat and soothe the stomach and intestines. This property also makes fenugreek seeds a good choice for helping patients with acid reflux.

The water soluble fibre in fenugreek helps to relieve constipation.

Because of their anti-inflammatory properties, fenugreek seeds and water have been successfully incorporated into diets to treat ulcerative colitis.

Advantageous to kidney health: Fenugreek water, especially when drunk warm, flushes out the toxins from the body. That is why it is recommended as your wake-up elixir. It helps the kidneys to function and also reduces the risk of kidney stones.

Good for clear skin: Beautiful skin is never just skin-deep! Since fenugreek water aids in digestion and the flushing of toxins, it’s great for shiny, healthful, blemish-free skin. This is the beauty secret of the savvy few. Try it and join the club.

Slimming with this ‘magic water’: Experts recommend two glasses of warm fenugreek water to prevent water retention in the body. So, no bloating! Fenugreek also suppresses the appetite. In fact, dieticians recommend drinking this magic potion at least twice a day.

Anti-inflammatory: Because of the anti-inflammatory properties of fenugreek, this decoction benefits sufferer from arthritis, chronic coughs, bronchitis, mouth ulcers, boils, etc.

Keeps your heart beating: This is the reason why chewing and swallowing the fenugreek seeds is recommended in addition to drinking the water. Fenugreek reduces the risk of cardio-vascular disease by controlling LDL cholesterol.

Fenugreek seeds are a woman’s good friend: Fenugreek contains diosgenin which helps decrease menstrual cramps and increase the flow of milk in lactating mothers.…

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Growing chamomile tea will not only  benefit your health, it will entice your senses. The scent of the tiny daisy like flowers of the Chamomile plant smell like freshly cut apples.  Chamomile should be a part of every basic herb garden. It is a hardy annual that adds beauty, attracts bees and butterflies due to the sweet fragrance the blooms give off, and makes a sweet flavorful tea. This is one of the pleasures of growing herbs.

One of the safest and gentlest of herbs, Chamomile has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes. Ancient Egyptians used the ground flowers to drink for fighting colds, calming nerves and alleviating skin irritations.

Modern science is now proving that the ancient cultures knew what they were talking about. Here are nine reasons you should consider growing Chamomile as part of your basic herb garden:

  • Chamomile has proven anti bacterial properties that enhance the immune system. It can be used in a steam for respiratory ailments such as hay fever, sinus infections and asthma.
  •  Has been used to decrease inflammation. The unsweetened tea is used on the skin to fight acne, skin      irritations and bee stings.
  • Chamomile has been proven to have properties that relax the muscles. Taken as a tea, it helps with menstrual cramps and sore muscles. It can also be used in a bath, to decrease muscle soreness and improve skin irritations. The sweet scent from the bath water will also brighten your mood.
  • Chamomile when made into a tea is known for its calming effect and it often taken before bedtime to aid in a good night’s sleep.

More drinking and growing Chamomile tea benefits your health

  •  New research studies show that the tiny daisy like flowers may have a chemical that will decrease the complications of Type 2 diabetes. This chemical has an affect that increases the ability of the cells to allow sorbitol to pass through the cell wall. In Type 2 diabetes, the sorbitol builds up outside the nerve cells and eyes causing pain and blindness.
  •  A cup of Chamomile tea to rinse your hair after it has been washed will bring out the gold highlights in brunette or dark blonde hair.
  •  If you are an avid gardener and start your plants indoors, Chamomile tea sprayed on your plants will prevent the seedlings from developing any type of fungus.
  • Used in composts, Chamomile tea is thought to increase the calcium level of the soil.          
  • Chamomile is safe for babies and is often make into a tepid tea to ease gas pains and soothe a teething baby.

There is nothing more soothing and appealing to the senses than to experience Chamomile tea made right from the blooms out of your own garden. I drink dried loose leaf Chamomile tea in the winter. But, in the summer, taking time to go out and pick the blooms and smell the sweet scent relaxes me. As I wait for the tea to steep, I experience the refreshing scent of newly cut apples. As I taste my tea from the garden, it is a lightly sweet taste that I feel does not need any sweetener added.  I know that when I use the loose leaf dried Chamomile tea, I often use a spot of honey or a touch of apple juice.  

Drinking and growing Chamomile tea not only benefits your health, your senses. The addition of this plant will benefit your garden as well. I hope you will choose to make this herb part of your basic herb garden year after year.

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Source by Connie Bednar

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