Tag: Eating

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So, if you suffer from IBS (or irritable bowel), one of the biggest questions you always face is – What can you eat? What diet will not flare up your symptoms? And what foods will actually help & heal your stomach?

There are many theories and diet programs that have been proposed for Irritable Bowel. In this article I'll examine the main ones I've tried, and then share what has worked for me in my 5 years of first hand research with this condition.

There are no Right or Wrong Foods

The first biggest myth I have to debunk right now, is that of "right foods". The truth is that there is no right or wrong food.

And every digestive system is unique. And every condition is unique. So, what may have worked for others may not work for you. On the other hand, what works for you may not work for others.

In this article, and the book you may choose to buy, I'll share some of the common foods and recipes that have been known to work. But the key thing in looking for the right diet with Irritable Bowel is to do this with a sense of experimentation. Track your diet and see what works for you, under what condition.

The other thing is that the food is sometimes related to the problem you're facing at the moment. For example, if you're experiencing gassiness at the moment – it's obviously best to avoid foods that would aggravate that.

Do Soluble Fibers Help Digestion?

You may have read in several books that foods rich in soluble fibers taken in small quantities over time can help IBS patients stabilize their digestive systems. Since it's one of the most popular theories out there, I gave it a good, hearty shot.

In my case, soluble fibers didn't help too much – although they didn't hurt either. I've read of several case studies where long term use of soluble fibers has helped improve the strength of the digestive system. In my case, they may have helped slightly – but a huge difference.

My advice to you is to try out soluble fibers – if it hurts, stop within the week. If it helps (or is neutral), then continue this as a lifestyle habit. Make soluble fibers part of 1 or 2 meals each day. So, it may be a safe bet to eat these foods when in doubt:

* Oat / Oat bran

* Dried beans and peas

* Nuts

* Barley

* Flax seed

* Fruits such as oranges and apples

* Vegetables such as carrots

* Psyllium husk

The acid-alkaline balance

Our body has a sensitive balance of acid and acidic content. This is known as the pH balance (you probably remember it from 9th grade chemistry). Usually when we lose this balance we end up getting acidity.

The problem is that almost everything we eat is acidic! Most meat, breads, coffee, soft drinks, and even fruits are acidic … So, how can regain your alkaline balance?

The easiest way is to drink lots of water. Yes, 2-3 liters of water each day will dilute the acidic effect and keep your pH balance normal. If you want to go one step further, drink alkaline drinks. This includes green tea, barley, wheat grass, lemon water, mango / watermelon / apple / guava juice and herb teas.

In the Goodbye IBS! book & bonuses, you'll find a handy cheat sheet of alkaline foods you can print and stick around the house. This will remind you to fill your diet with alkaline foods that constantly balance your pH. (you can find a mini-version of that bonus report at this URL – [http://goodbyeibs.com/diet])

Fresh, Vegetarian Food Is The Easiest To Digest

Have you every left cooked meat outside, in the eat for 72 hours? You know what happens to it … it starts, attracts acterial growth and you generally throw it away, right?

Well, did you know it takes red meat 60-72 hours to pass through your digestive system? And your stomach is hotter and more humid than any environment outside … just imagine what your digestive system has to put through to …

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Body Trust

A few months ago I took an online course at Be Nourished, about Body Trust. It hugely impacted my thinking about my body, weight, diet, exercise. I had put on quite a bit of weight in my early 40s and no matter what I did, nothing would budge it. But in the process I learned a lot about nutrition and exercise.

I had a lot of shame about my weight and the way I looked, and it really impacted my ability to be in the world and being seen. My thoughts in the day were taken up with exercise, and walking as many steps as I could. I had a fitbit and the fit bit scales, and I was constantly thinking about food, exercise and how to reduce my weight. I hated looking in the mirror, and I felt as if I wasn’t doing enough to get my weight down.

I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism in 2016, and I had to go for 6 week blood tests for my thyroid and liver. Two of the tests for my liver showed my enzymes were elevated.

When I participated in the Body Trust course, I came to see how my relationship with my body was really controlling. One of the meme’s they have on their site is “We cannot hate ourselves into a version of ourselves we can love.” The shame I was feeling was because we live in a fat phobic society, and we think we can diet our way to losing weight and being the size we want to be, AND at the same time have a loving relationship with our bodies. We can’t.

Fat Shaming

We aren’t the problem, our society has dysfunctional values, and leads us to believe we can control our weight, if we just apply ourselves the right way.

I wanted to fit in so I didn’t feel shame. I wanted to be invisible and not stand out, and being overweight made me feel as if I stood out too much. I thought I attracted too much negative attention.

Healthy Eating

I knew so much about food. I’d tried lots of diets, which all seemed to focus on healthy eating. The Wheat Belly Diet, Paleo, Plant Paradox, Eat Right For Your Bloodtype. I tried them all. Nothing made a difference, but I told myself I was eating healthy so I must have a slow metabolism, or it’s my thyroid affecting my weight, or its high cortisol from the stress from the earthquakes.

I had very good self restraint. I could go no sugar, no wheat, no gluten, and I was always trying a new way of eating, or importing foods from overseas, or trying to track down ingredients around the country. I had tons and tons of vitamins and supplements. My body was like an obsession, wanting to change it, control it through what I was eating and how I was moving.

Orthorexia

Orthorexia is the other end of the spectrum of disordered eating. It’s an obsession with healthy eating. It can be virtuous and elitist and shaming of anyone who doesn’t eat healthy. It’s very covert because it just appears like you are looking after yourself really well. I told myself I was just keeping up with the trends, the various chefs who wrote healthy cookbooks. I was optimising my health. I put A LOT of pressure on myself to eat perfect. My best friend had died from pancreatic cancer and that scared me to bits. I gave food a lot of power to hurt me and I was very rigid about what I ate.

In fact I think the way I was eating contributed to my thyroid condition, I’ve since read that going low carbs can throw your thyroid out of whack.

Control

I learned on the course all about how to take the shame out of eating, out of my obsession about my size and weight. I realised I was obsessing about exercise in an unhealthy way too. I sold my fit bit and scales. I had a lot of fear about stopping thinking about exercise and food. I feared I would become a fat slob, that I would eat …

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If you travel for work or pleasure, you know that healthy food can sometimes be hard to come by. Or I should at least say there are so many temptations out there that the healthy options seem few and far between. Being prepared is 75% of the battle when it comes to eating healthy while traveling. It definitely requires a little planning and a special nutritional strategy. Luckily, you can adhere to your healthy eating plan with a little extra work. These 8 tips for healthy eating while traveling provide some solid ideas to staying on track while on the go.

1. Location – When you’re choosing where to stay, it’s all about location. Let’s say you’re traveling for work and you’ll be in the same location for at least a few days. Finding a spot that’s close to healthy resources is key. Is there a grocery store nearby that you can run to for healthy snacks and/or meals? Are there healthy cafes or restaurants within walking distance that you can stop in for a bite to eat? It’s easy to make the excuse that you can’t eat healthy while on the road if there aren’t good options around you. Don’t make that your excuse. Choose as wisely as you can to set yourself up for success.

2. Accommodations With A Kitchen or Kitchenette – One of the best ways to ensure healthy eating while traveling is to have access to some type of kitchen. Extended stay hotels, vacation rentals and Air B & B are all great options if convenient to your location. If a kitchen isn’t available, having a refrigerator in your hotel room for some healthy options is a great alternative. The point being that if you have either a kitchen or a refrigerator, you have the ability stock up with good snacks and easy meals. Things like fresh fruit and vegetables, bottled water, cottage cheese, greek yogurt, nuts, natural peanut butter, rotisserie chicken and canned fish are fantastic options that are easy to store and don’t require a lot of prep work to create a quick meal or snack.

3. Ship Items Before – Another strategy would be to ship your favorite dry goods to your location before hand. Protein powder, beans, nuts, canned tuna, bread and quick cooking oats are all items you could have sent prior to your arrival so that you have some healthy options waiting for you.

4. Carry A Cooler – Tote your health food around with you. Stock a cooler full of your favorite healthy snacks, sandwiches, bottled water and anything you need for the day. This options works well if you can drive to your location and bring your cooler with you. If you’re flying, you’ll need a collapsible cooler to pack in your suitcase.

5. Research Restaurants In The Area – Do your research before you go. Even if you have access to a kitchen or a refrigerator, you still may want or need to eat for a few meals. Find out what restaurants are in the area and which menus offer healthy options that interest you. You can plan any outings to one of these restaurants and know what you’re going to eat when you walk in the door.

6. Protein Powder – Protein is often the hardest thing to come by. Healthy eating on the go is made much easier if you can bring some protein powder with you. Even it it’s a back up, you know you have a good protein source to go to if you can’t find a viable option. Sometimes your healthy eating strategy might require using a combination of options. For example, finding some fruit and vegetables might be easy but grabbing a protein source might be pretty expensive. In certain cases, protein powder can fill in the gaps.

7. Supergreen Supplement – It’s often times very difficult to get the correct amount of vegetables in when traveling. This is the perfect time to incorporate a great supplement like Amazing Grass, Green Defense or Greens +. A supplement is just that – a way to supplement your diet. While this shouldn’t be your mainstay to getting in vegetables, it can …

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