Tag: Education

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Since 1960s, career cluster resources have been used as career exploration and planning tools in schools, learning communities, and organizations across the nation. Career Clusters is a system that matches educational and career planning.

Step 1: Identifying Career Cluster Interest Areas

Career clusters are groups of similar occupations and industries. When teachers, counselors, and parents work with teens, college students, and adults, the first step is to complete career cluster assessment. The assessment identifies the highest career cluster areas. Career assessments show teens, college students, and adults rankings from one of the following 16 interests Areas or Clusters:

1. Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources

2. Architecture & Construction

3. Arts, A / V Technology & Communication

4. Business, Management & Administration

5. Education & Training

6. Finance

7. Government & Public Administration

8. Health Science

9. Hospitality & Tourism

10. Human Services

11. Information Technology

12. Law, Public Safety & Security

13. Manufacturing

14. Marketing, Sales & Service

15. Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

16. Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Step 2: Exploring Career Clusters and Related Careers

After pinpointing the highest career clusters, teens, college students, and adults explore the different careers and create education plans. Career cluster tools used in career and educational planning include:

  • LISA: A comprehensive career cluster database
  • Models
  • Brochures
  • Pathways
  • High school plan of study
  • Interest and Skills Areas
  • Crosswalks

After completing a career cluster assessment, teens, college students, and adults look at web sites, career models, brochures, pathways, and high school plans. One of the most unique comprehensive career cluster resources is the Louisiana Integrated Skills Assessment (LISA), an Internet program. LISA lets you explore career clusters, careers, abilities, training requirements, and more. There are 3 steps in the LISA program:

STEP 1: Click here to select a Career Cluster

STEP 2: Click here to select a Career Group

STEP 3: Explore Occupations within this Career Group

In Step 1, when you choose a career cluster, you will see a description of the cluster. When you select a career group in Step 2, you see different careers. Finally, in Step 3, you see a wealth of information:

  • Job descriptions
  • Educational and training requirements
  • Crosswalks, for example ONET, DOT, GOE, and other codes
  • Abilities
  • Knowledge
  • Skills
  • Tasks
  • Work Values
  • Labor Market Information

Even though LISA is an awesome program, in classroom or workshop settings, you need printed materials. When using printed materials, the career model is the best place to start. Models provide excellent overviews listing the cluster definitions, sample careers, pathways, knowledge, and skills. Visual models show career clusters, the cluster subgroups, and related careers. Models are an excellent way to introduce career clusters.

For presentations, workshops, and group discussions, the career cluster brochures provide additional information. Adults and teens read about the different careers that are available in each career cluster. Teachers, counselors, and parents use the brochures to solidify adults 'and teens' potential career or educational decisions. The brochures cover topics such as:

  • Definition of career clusters
  • Careers
  • Career pathways
  • Employment outlooks
  • Skills
  • Credentials

Teachers, counselors, and parents use career pathways for more detailed information. The career pathways are subgroups or areas of concentration within career clusters. Each pathway contains career groups. The career groups have similar academic skills, technical skills, educational requirements, and training requirements. Career pathways are plans of study that outline required secondary courses, post secondary courses, and related careers. The career pathways are essential tools that teachers, counselors, parents, and other adults use to give educational planning advice.

Several web sites feature High School Plans of Study. These study plans show required, elective, and suggested courses for each grade level. The school plans also match the career clusters to related careers, career pathways, and post-secondary options. Teachers, counselors, and parents find that these school plans are guides for selecting the right high school courses to match potential careers. Beyond high school, the Utah System for Higher Education has created a College Major Guide. Parents, teachers, and counselors can use the guide to match college majors to Certificate and Degree Programs.

Additional Resources for Counselors and Teachers

For planning curriculum and educational programs, there are detailed Knowledge and Skills Charts and Cluster Crosswalks. The knowledge and Skills expand …

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Traditional classroom instructor, Mr. Dean Sahbroo, has a great job. He gets to school every morning at 8:00 am, reboots his computer, turns on the projector, and unzips the day’s lesson plans from the mini drive he carries around on his key chain. The computer screen initiates and little icons start appearing, then after a few moments in the middle of the screen a tiny hoop shows a clockwise circulating pulse. Around and around it goes and after about a minute of this Mr. Sahbroo realizes the LED on his mini drive is not flashing. He tries unplugging it and plugging it back in again.

Nothing.

Dean concludes his computer system must be “hung up.” He grabs the mini drive out of his computer and walks over to the administration office to ask the cheerful school assistant, Ms. Dunelle Carple, if she could try loading it on her computer. She obliges. Sure enough the LED starts flashing and a folder image appears on her screen. She clicks on it and then launches a document called “Third Grade Lesson 1&2:”

MAJOR AREA: The Human Body

GRADE: Third Grade (Lesson 1&2)

TOPIC: Circulatory System

EMPHASIS: Anatomy & Physiology – Heart and blood vessels

MATERIALS:PPT. DVD. Worksheet.

CONTENT:

Power Point Lecture

  1. Description of Heart
  2. Hollow muscle
  3. Weight 11 oz.
  4. Size of

*brrympht*. The document closes unexpectedly and after a few moments in the middle of the screen a tiny hoop shows a clockwise circulating pulse.*pop*. A dialogue message box appears “Warning: Removable Drive Unreadable.” Dunelle picks up the phone and calls the help desk. She describes slowly step-by-step what happened on their computers and what she and Mr. Sahbroo have done. Suddenly the normally cheerful expression on Ms. Carple’s face turns ashen.

“Reimage?”

Reimage is a term used in association with computers. Essentially it means your operating system has slowed down or crashes too often because some software became damaged, corrupted or plagued with ‘bugs.’ During the re-imaging process everything on your computer system is removed and then reinstalled or better yet replaced with an upgraded version. Most people are deathly afraid of re-imaging and opt to simply reboot their system by turning it off and on again.

A quality health education class requires more than a simple rebooting process. The above hypothetical scenario of loading a prepackaged health lesson to be taught by someone not professionally prepared to teach health illustrates just one obvious pitfall of over-reliance on one form of technology (for a few more pitfalls see “Death by PowerPoint” from Don McMillan). Technology can certainly help with instruction, but up to this point it has been a great unrealized hope in educational reform.

Other repetitive routines including outdated lectures, recycled worksheets, and over copied quizzes need to be replaced with authentic or lifelike activities and assessments that engage the students. Students do learn what they live. Health topics relate most intimately with a student unlike other traditional class subjects. Leave it those other classes to describe the heart as a ‘hollow muscle.’ Students in health class can feel their own pulse and talk about what it means to “have a heart.”

Once the static lifeless instruction is removed, then the lessons can be resuscitated with the students themselves breathing life into the learning activities. How this sense of authenticity extends beyond words can be found in the lyrics “Unwritten” by Natasha Bedingfield, “No one else can feel it for you, Only you can let it in.” Through in class activities students record their own comprehensive health textbook with an inner voice.

Topics such as eating disorders, alcohol related problems, harmful ways of relating, and childhood obesity to name a few can be discussed in small groups then shared with the whole class. So a student is not alone reading a textbook but supported by peers in a skit creation, a game, a Socratic seminar, or a project. Sometimes the work created can also serve as the assessment. This style also lends itself well to treatment of emerging current wellness topics such as new allergies or diseases.

In review it should be noted that over reliance on power point slides should be …

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Benefits and Importance of Physical Education | Body Fitness and Health

In the Present World of Space age and automation era, all human beings appear to be living a more and more inactive life. They ride instead of walk, sit instead of stand and watches instead of participants. Such type of inactivity or sedentary life is detrimental to mental and physical health. Thus, there is great need for physical education as a part of balanced living.

Following are the importance or benefits of physical education –

1. It is needed because due to advanced technology the lifestyle of people becomes sedentary and they become passive entertainer.

2. It is needed during childhood for proper growth and development.

3. It is beneficial during adulthood to maintain good health and fitness.

4. During old Age, it is important to prevent and treat various ailments and disease.

5. It is important as it provides us the knowledge of our bodies from musculoskeletal, physiological and biochemical point of view.

6. It teaches us various physical activities that can be practiced now in later life such as motor skills for the games and sports of volleyball, tennis, swimming and so on.

7. It also teaches us the value of ethical behavior in sporting situations.

8. It teaches us the value of physical fitness and how to become physically fit.

9. It teaches us the value of physical fitness and how to become physically fit.

10. It is important for aesthetic reasons as by participation in physical fitness programs like gymnastics and dance, beauty and grace in cultivated in the movement.

11. It is also important for catharsis reasons with mean releasing of energy, emotion, tension or frustration and some people let off their extra steam by participating in various games and sports which are part of physical education. This way physical education helps in checking juvenile delinquency.

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Source by Mikey Singh

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Public health education can be considered an ambiguous term. It teaches the proper way to improve one’s health, and can involve only one or two people, or the population of several countries. Anything that can seriously threaten the physical, mental, or spiritual health of a wide range of people, notably due to their interactions with one another, can be classified as a threat to the community’s public health. This is why public health education becomes a necessary tool to aid people against the spread of potential diseases and illnesses. Five of the most important reasons of how public health education can prove beneficial are as follows:

1. People are able to learn how to prevent the spread of communicable diseases through the training and methods being taught in education. People are able to have better access to information regarding general prevention of diseases, including the knowledge of what to do and how to act during epidemics in their area. Certain diseases have their own individual prevention methods that people should be well aware of, and employing these techniques lessens the risk of being infected by possible diseases. Through public health education, even simple things such as wearing a flu mask in particularly affected areas, or knowing when to take vaccines for a particular illness that is prominent at that time of the year, always proves very effective in limiting the number of people affected annually.

2. More people are able to access private and public medical institutions to prevent diseases or medical conditions, or to better treat them. Without the benefits of a public health education, most people may feel healthy enough and not find the need to go for a general check-up. Being aware that it is necessary to see your doctor regularly is one of the important things learned in a good public health education. Most medical hospitals and clinics offer immunization or vaccine shots during the flu seasons, or when a general outbreak of hepatitis is going around, and a public health education ensures that more people know to go to these facilities and avail of the treatment, thereby lessening the amount of ill people.

3. People are able to adopt a healthier behavior to lessen the risk of diseases being spread among themselves. Keeping things cleaner around the house, opting to lessen or quit smoking altogether, or exercising more are just a few of the many different ways taught in public health education to combat sickness and improve one’s lifestyle.

4. People become more aware of information relating to the disease, rather than believing in just public perception. Public health education not only deals with how to prevent illnesses, it also provides details of how a disease works, which may dispel some myths and fallacies about it in society. The HIV virus for example, can be spread through unprotected sexual intercourse, but not through activities such as kissing or touching. This also helps change a person’s views towards someone infected, promoting more empathy rather than discrimination.

5. People are able to help and contribute to disease prevention by supporting or volunteering at health care facilities. Public health education is more than just spreading information; it also calls people to actively participate in aiding others. To be able to protect one’s health, it is also necessary to protect the health of other people around you, and helps foster a more close-knit community and a better sense of camaraderie.

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Source by Jes B

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Despite the onset of menstruation being an important milestone in the transition from childhood to adulthood, it is often viewed as a major concern.

In Kenya for example, millions of girls who have reached puberty are highly dis-empowered due to lack of access to sanitary wear. Many adolescent girls from disadvantaged families cannot afford to buy sanitary towels, and opt to using insanitary methods.

Girls who cannot afford sanitary pads resort to crude and unhygienic methods, including using old pieces of mattresses, old cloth, or inserting cotton wool into their uterus to try to block the flow. In Kenya’s sprawling urban slums, girls collect used pads from garbage dumps, and wash them for their own use, resulting in serious health complications.

Millions of girls in Kenya are at risk of dropping out of school at the onset of menstruation. According to a study by the Ministry of Education, Kenyan adolescent girls miss approximately 3.5 million learning days per month during their menstrual cycle. This hinders their ability to compete in the classroom, leads to low self-esteem, higher drop-out rates and, in some regions, makes them vulnerable to early marriage. Along with the lost learning days, girls lose self-confidence, and the opportunity of achieving their potential diminishes further each month.

Limited access to safe, affordable, convenient and hygienic methods for managing menstruation has far-reaching implications for the rights and physical, social and mental well being of adolescent girls. It not only undermines sexual and reproductive health and well being but has been shown to restrict girls’ access to education when they miss school due to lack of proper ways of managing their menstruation. This has an impact on their performance and could ultimately lead to some dropping out of school.

Presently, women comprise the majority of illiterate adult Kenyans at 58 per cent. Appreciably, this is as a result of their inability to complete school for many of the reasons associated with sexual and reproductive health.

The second and third Millennium Development Goals (MDG2&3), “achieve universal primary education”, and “promote gender equality and empowerment,” are not only key development goal in their own right, but also an important means to achieving all MDGs. It is imperative that Kenya speeds up her efforts and take additional action to ensure that the millions of girls affected by the lack of education benefit from the basic promises of the MDGs. Action needs to be taken to address the underlying causes that restrict women’s economic opportunities.

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Source by Felix Muvea

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