Tag: Hope

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The above title is a quote by Einstein, and it is, indeed, excellent advice. Einstein was, of course, one of the greatest scientists who ever lived, if not the greatest. Much of modern physics is based on his discoveries. In later life, however, he also became a philosopher of considerable importance, and he gave us a lot of useful information about life. His quotes are seen everywhere. The above quote can be generalized to: Learn from the Past, Live in the Present, Hope for the Future. And if you do each of these, you will, indeed, be much happier.

What do we mean by each of the above statements? Let’s look at them in turn.

Learn from Yesterday

We should, indeed, learn from the past — particularly from the mistakes we have made in the past. We certainly don’t want to make the same mistakes again. But we also don’t want to spend a lot of time thinking about these mistakes; they’re over and done, and there’s nothing we can do about them except learn form them. So don’t continue to rehash them, and don’t become obsessed with them. If you do, they could become a source of frustration, and they could make you fearful of failure in the future. In short, they could make you very insecure, and this is, of course, something you don’t want. So learn from them, and forget them.

It is, of course, okay to think about the past occasionally, savoring some of the joys you have experienced, but you should return to the present as quickly as possible. Don’t develop a nostalgia for the past. This is a common fault with many people; they daydream about how happy their past life was, and how dull and humdrum their present life is. Maybe your past life was better in some respects, but too many people magnify the happiness of their past life and forget about the struggles and sorrows they experienced. If your present life appears to be dull compared to your past life, it’s up to you to make it better.

Don’t keep longing for the past, Today is much more important. It’s the present — what’s happening now — and you should make the most of it.

Live for Today

Enjoy the day you’re living in. Wake up in the morning with confidence, and a feeling that the day is going to be the best you have ever experienced. One of the best ways to do this is to relax and live each day as if it were your last.

Dale Carnegie encourages everyone to live in “Day-tight compartments.” And it’s the best advice anyone could give you. As he says, ” Half the beds in our hospitals are reserved for patients with nervous and mental troubles, patients who have collapsed under the crushing burden of accumulated yesterdays and fearful tomorrows. Yet a vast majority of these people would be walking the streets today, leading happy, useful lives, if they had heeded the words… “Live in day-tight compartments.”

In other words: Shut off the past. Shut off the future. Live for today! This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t prepare for the future; it means you should not have any anxiety about the future. If you fret and worry about the future continuously, you could end up in the nuthouse.

So live one day at a time. Think of each new day as a new adventure — a new life. Tell yourself that it’s going to be the best day of your life. One of the major tragedies of many peoples life is that they keep putting things off. In particular, they put life itself off. They’re always telling themselves that life will be better — after they marry, when they retire, and so on. And as they wait, life passes, and suddenly they discover that it has left them behind. They have forgotten, or perhaps never learned, how to enjoy life, or maybe they’ve been too busy and haven’t had enough time. Life is in the living, and it’s important to learn this. “Today is our most important possession. Don’t throw it away. Cherish it. Live it. Enjoy it!”

Our happiness and peace …

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The Orlando schools will be promoting health and wellness to its students this year. As part of the Orange County FL District, the schools in Orlando will implement a new wellness policy that was just approved this month.

The new policy is in response to a federal mandate, under the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004. All schools that receive federal funding for lunch programs must have a wellness policy in place.

The wellness program for the schools in Orlando is designed to promote better health to their students. Healthy eating and physical activity will play a big part in the Orlando policy. The hope is to completely change the environments to healthier ones.

With the new wellness program effective on the first day, each of the schools is challenged to be creative and innovative in implementing wellness activities and promotions.

Each of the schools in Orlando will create a Healthy School Team (HST). The organization of each team is based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Coordinated School Health Model. There will be a member on each HST to represent each of the following areas of health:

o Health education,

o Counseling.

o Psychological and social services,

o School health services,

o Nutrition services,

o Physical education,

o The healthy school environment,

o Health promotion for Orlando schools’ staff, and

o Family and community.

Under the belief that healthy children is a community-wide concern, each of the Orlando schools will enlist the involvement of parents, families, teachers, counselors, school administrators, healthcare professionals, businesses, and community groups and organizations.

The Orange County schools already have experimented with the wellness program, which will benefit the Orlando schools. For almost three years, the program has been used in 13 schools within the county. The HSTs have been found to be quite effective in promoting health and wellness, not only for the students but their families and school staff, as well. The Orlando schools will use much of the information and experiences from these schools, when implementing their own wellness program this year.

The experimental HSTs have sponsored walking and running clubs for students, school staff, and parents. Another example of creative thinking by the HSTs is “wellness Wednesdays”, whereby students are rewarded for being involved in healthy activities, such as eating nutritious lunches, drinking water versus soda, or participating in a physical activity. Each HST at the Orlando schools will be charged with developing activities that meet the specific needs of each school and its students. The HST members are limited only by their own imaginations to develop creative promotions, events and activities.

The new wellness program at the Orlando schools is all about health and wellness for children, and helping everyone concerned to understand the importance of good health and its effect upon a child’s ability to learn. From the federal mandate to the Orlando schools’ implementation of the wellness program, the sole purpose is to improve the health of students in order for them to be better able to learn and achieve — now and in the future.

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Source by Patricia Hawke

Fear Vs Hope: Semantics in Healthcare

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The words we choose can affect our health, recovery and overall outlook on life. As doctors, we are always learning how to communicate more effectively with patients. Choosing specific words in certain circumstances can completely alter a patient’s belief in their ability to heal themselves, and therefore can drastically affect the results they experience under our hands as Chiropractors.

One example is the word “chronic”, medically defined as a condition lasting longer than six weeks. You must admit, the word “chronic” feels more intense than that. We tend to associate “chronic” with “never-ending”, “degenerative”, “progressive”, “disabling”, “lifelong” and sometimes even “hopeless”.

Now, if you believe that chronic conditions represent these things, which most people I meet do, how likely will you be to overcome the condition? If someone of authority tells you that your condition is chronic, and therefore possibly disabling, and something you will have to learn to live with (perhaps managing it with medications for the rest of your life), it’s kind of depressing, right?

My experience tells me that patients who believe this line of reasoning, accepting these definitions of a “chronic” condition, are less likely to improve.

Let’s try another word, like “persistent”. It’s true, a “persistent” condition may end up being all those things listed above, but doesn’t this word also have inherent in its meaning the possibility of ultimately going away, as we might describe a persistent cough or bad infection, or the persistent bad behavior of a child or dog?

We must be careful of the words we accept for ourselves-the words we use to describe ourselves and our conditions. We should also be careful of how we choose to identify with our conditions, like saying “my back pain” or “my chronic neck pain”, as if it’s something you embody and will always be a part of you. This may seem subtle, but choosing to use words like “my chronic migraines” instead of, for example, “the head pain I experience”, can begin a long-term identification with that condition, making it much more difficult for you to recover from (if, indeed, there does exist a possibility for you to recover from it).

I personally am very careful about the words I use when offering a diagnosis to my patients. I do see a lot of neuromusculoskeletal conditions that, over time, may worsen, especially if specific care is not taken to correct the imbalance leading to the problem. Long-term conditions in the spine typically get named “degenerative”, as in neck or back pain caused by degenerative osteo-arthritis. But one thing that remains uncertain with conditions such as these-it’s nearly impossible to predict just how fast the condition will degenerate, which patients will succumb to more sinister degeneration, and which patients may slow the process down, and in some cases reverse the problem.

It may sound a bit silly, but I refer to degenerative arthritis as “wrinkles” in the spine, or “wear and tear”. It gets the point across while avoiding the use of the word “degenerative”, and it leaves open the possibility for improved function and healing, the chance that maybe, just maybe, tomorrow might feel better than today. And since no one ever knows for sure the exact prognosis for any one patient, I suspect it’s better to be a bit more open with predicted patient outcomes. Of course, I understand that in some cases patients really do wish to hear their doctor’s prediction for how long they might have given certain perilous disease processes. But I am also aware of many patients who end up living well past their doctor’s prognosis.

On another related tangent, where does “developing” in one’s life end and “aging” begin? Raising my daughter, I get to marvel at the developmental milestones she reaches, and as any parent will tell you, sometimes a new quality of maturity can be witnessed in your child when they wake up in the morning after one night’s sleep. Yes, sometimes you can actually see a difference in your child overnight!

We all agree that babies, teens, and adults age with each passing day, and that some qualities continue to develop throughout our lives, but somewhere along the way we stop seeing our …

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