Tag: Performance

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Scientists believe that brain function naturally begins to deteriorate after you turn twenty, just like our physical and muscular strength gradually weakens as we age. However, just as you can maintain your physical strength if you exercise regularly, you can keep your brain power from deteriorating by providing daily stimulation for your brain.

In order to maintain your physical health, you have to (1) exercise regularly, (2) eat healthily and (3) sleep well. Similarly, in order to keep your brain healthy, you need to (1) exercise your brain regularly, (2) eat healthily and (3) sleep well.

Neuroscientists found that the brain exercises increase the delivery of oxygen, blood, and various amino acids in the prefrontal cortex. The result is more neurons and neural connections, which are characteristics of a healthy brain.

In a research carried out by me with 23 students in the age group of 15 to 28, I found the results are really encouraging. The brain exercises included are (1) Arithmetic calculations, (2) Reverse order (alphabets), (3) Sense of Direction, (4) Most repeated letter, (5) Spatial sense, (6) Series completion, and (7) Word memory. All the tests are exercised mentally and no writing materials are used. The first test contains 20 simple arithmetic calculations involving the two mathematical operators, addition and subtraction. To pass the test the participant should score 18 correct answers. In the first attempt, 9 participants passed the test. Out of this 2 participants scored 100 percent. The best time was 1 minute and 55 seconds with 90 percent accuracy. Maximum attempts taken by a participant to pass this first level test were 4. In the first attempt, the participant (age, 26 years and 6 months) took 3 minutes and 34 seconds with 15% accuracy and in the 4th attempt the person took only 2 minutes and 28 seconds with 95% accuracy. It means not only the participant was able to pass this test but also the person improved speed. In the next 14 sessions, the participant passed the next 5 levels comfortably and didn’t take more than 4 attempts at anyone level. The participant passed the 6th level in 3 minutes and 35 seconds with 90% accuracy. Encouraged by the progress of the participant, I gave two advanced levels of arithmetic tests. The participant passed the advanced level test 1 in the first attempt in 2 minutes and 39 seconds with 95% accuracy and the advanced level test 2 in two attempts in 4 minutes and 50 seconds with 90% accuracy. In the next session, the participant improved the time with 4 minutes and 20 seconds (repeat of advanced level test 2).

Arithmetic calculations contain several levels. As the participants passed each level, they were tested with higher levels. Almost all participants hit a wall at a certain point. When the test was repeated several times they were able to get the breakthrough.

The most crucial point in any kind of training is continuity. It is ideal to train your brain, when your brain is the most active. It is also important to eat before you do the calculation exercise; otherwise, the effects will be reduced by half (don’t eat food that makes you sleep). At the onset of training your brain function will improve somewhat steadily. However, you will probably hit a wall at a certain point. You may wonder why your results are not showing any sign of improvement. But if you hang in there and continue your training, a breakthrough will come, and you will see your scores suddenly jump. If you are facing doldrums, just remember that your brain is preparing for a leap.

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Source by P Mathivanan

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"Position the organization to compete on value: it is the new reality."

– National Committee for Quality Healthcare, Pay for Performance PPT Primer (2006)

Most health care professionals would say that providing value – high quality care, timely delivery and patient satisfaction – is their mission. Yet, positioning a health care organization to compete based on the value of its services is a relatively new idea, and one whose time has come – that is, depending on whom you ask.

Many payers are in favor of linking some portion of provider payments to quality and efficiency metrics. As of 2006, more than half the HMOs in the United States offered such "Pay for Performance" provider contracts. Given that in excess of 15 percent of the nation's gross domestic product is now spent on health care insurers are hoping that Pay For Performance (P4P) plans will make patients healthier and ultimately reduce the cost of health care.

Health care consumers also appreciate being able to compare physicians and facilities when making decisions about where to seek care. Unfortunately, P4P measurements of hospitals and health care providers have yet to be standardized, which can be confusing to someone trying to compare reviews from different sources.

Despite these challenges, health care appears to be moving in the direction of consumer-driven selection. As a result, the industry is increasing its measurement of results and its adherence to guidelines. However, in order to compete in this new market, physicians, hospitals, laboratories and other health care organizations must do more than simply measure their processes and report on results. They must demonstrate improvement in these areas over time.

For healthcare organizations, viable and sustainable improvement requires three things:

1. An established system that can be applied to any process, clinical or administrative, to positively impact outcomes and metrics.

2. A methodology that is easily transferable, so health care professionals can learn to apply it to their own processes as they help patients.

3. A common language that drives the process of improvement but is flexible enough to be adapted to the specific culture of each organization.

While P4P provides a venerable stick to grow by, it remains to be seen whether it provides the means to grow. In contrast, a well-designed Performance Excellence program, based on a proven methodology such as Lean Six Sigma, can help health care providers realize dramatic and long-lasting improvements in the areas measured measured by P4P metrics: safety, efficacy, timeliness, efficiency , equality and consumer focus.

Most importantly, Performance Excellence and Pay for Performance share the same goal: to provide high quality patient care with the best possible outcome at the lowest cost. Whether this objective is labeled a value proposition, a mission statement, or just the way health care should be, it's a goal that providers, payers and patients can all support.

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Source by Debra Jennings

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Golf fitness exercises and training can be very beneficial for the mature golfer. There is no doubt the aging process affects the body and in turn adversely effects the golf swing. The aging process decreases mobility, limits flexibility, negates strength, and lowers power outputs. All which are crucial components in the execution of the golf swing.

The good news is there is help: certain steps can be taken to alleviate these symptoms of the aging process. For example, modifications in equipment can help, changes on the mechanics of your swing can be of great assistance, and the implementation of a golf fitness program can be of immense assistance as well. These three steps can assist in returning your swing to a level previously achieved or even improve your game to a level higher than ever before. In order for this to occur, the mature player must remember it is a combination of all three of these parameters; equipment, swing mechanics, and golf fitness training working seamlessly together.

Looking at the golf fitness side of game improvement in your fifties, a few important statistics may provide some relatively to the importance of golf exercises for game improvement. First and foremost, research indicates after the age of 25, the body looses muscle mass at approximately 1% a year. This decreases both the strength and power outputs of the neuromuscular system. If nothing is done to improve both the strength and power outputs of the body by the time an individual is 50 years old they will have lost 25% of their muscle mass.

Why is this statistic important relative to the game of golf?

In order to execute each phase of the golf swing efficiently, the neuromuscular system must have certain levels of strength. This allows the golfer to maintain a fixed spine angle, execute the postural position required in the swing, and generate speed. Basically, a loss of strength equates to the loss of stability in the golf swing affecting every phase of the swing from taking away to finish.

A second component of the aging process relative to the golf swing is mobility and flexibility. Mobility is a combination of both joint range of motion and flexibility. Joint range of motion concerns itself with the actual articular structure of the joint (i.e. skeletal structures), and flexibility has to do with extensibility of muscle tissue surrounding the joint.

The aging process decreases the extensibility of muscular tissues thus causing tightness in the muscular system and decreased mobility in the joint system. Both of these conditions are detrimental to the golf swing. The mechanics of the swing requires mobility within the joint system and flexibility within the muscular system. This allows for the requirement of drawing the club through a large range motion to be met by the body. If mobility is limited and “tightness” exists within the muscular system compensations within the swing will occur in an attempt to execute the mechanics of the golf swing correctly.

It is unfortunate the aging process results in the aforementioned negative affects on the golf swing, but as stated previously, steps can be taken to address such situations and prevent decreased performances on the golf course. These steps on the “physical side” of the equation are contained within a golf fitness program.

A golf fitness program for the mature player will address the negative affects of the aging process through the development of the required levels of mobility, flexibility, stability, strength, and power required to execute the mechanics of the golf swing correctly.

Dissection of this formula for performance improvement through golf fitness training for the mature player breaks down the process into the development of “five physical pillars” within the body. The pillars are as follows: flexibility, balance, strength, endurance, and power. The cohesive development of these physical parameters creates the opportunity of developing sound swing mechanics.

To improve performance, remove physical years from the body, and prevent injury in your game, it is necessary to develop the “five physical pillars” of the swing. Additionally, the golfer must address them on order: beginning with flexibility, moving onto balance, and completing the sequence with power training. Following this suggested progression allows for the …

You ever heard of muscle and fitness gurus? They for the most part today are coming to believe in mindfulness and mental health leading the way. It’s the benefits of mindfulness meditation.

You may be like many who say, I just don’t have time in my life to master mindfulness training. My gosh, “meditation” techniques!

You may think it literally takes HOURS, and Weeks and months and YEARS to master this skill!

Not any longer!

Now, I got to be honest with you… that both surprised me… but also ticked me off.

In some long interviews, I discovered through some muscle and fitness gurus found ONE practice that just about every single one of these top athletes shared.

It makes it stupid easy.

Because the ego- based mind is insanely difficult to intentionally re-program!

Doubting Thomas aspect in us all that the Course in Miracles helps us to undo the ego– that fearful side to us.

The Course in Miracles teaches that, “The ego may see some good, but never only good.”

One guy I spoke to at my local gym has one of the most popular fitness-oriented ideas and mindsets around.

What’s this ONE foundational practice that even fuels the world’s TOP performing muscle and fitness athletes?

It makes sense, doesn’t it?

Much of muscle and fitness peak performance is “mental,”?

One pro recently wrote a few things he learned after interviewing many other muscle and fitness performers… athletes who DOMINATE their sport.

A brand new technology in mindfulness and mental health muscle and fitness is REVOLUTIONIZING the connection between fitness and mindfulness.

In a previous discussion involving details on being a better leader with a richer life through yoga and mindfulness meditation techniques, it was discovered how many people rich peak performance.

It’s called it a meta-skill that’s a “force multiplier” for every other skill you might master.

It’s revolutionized my own workouts!

Others as well are manifesting success like I never thought possible.

You’ve GOT to look deeper into mindfulness training and/or other mind, body, spirit techniques, if you do nothing else for muscle and fitness in this coming year, at least do THIS.

Seriously, it’ll help take your performance to the next level.

Remember, if you’ve spent ANY money at all on your fitness: gym memberships, trainers, fitness programs, supplements, equipment, competitions, etc., meditation multiplies the effectiveness of every single one of them.

I’ve NEVER experienced gains like this… because in my routine, a simple pair of headphones, and a few minutes, and it’s taken my performance to a whole new level.

I’m finding it gives us more self-confidence in reaching within for our full potential.

(As always be sure to investigate and research the web on how many may come to improve life in an instant by your power of choice.)

To peak performance!

Source by James Nussbaumer

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