Tag: Safety

[ad_1]

The Occupational Health and Safety Act (OSHA) is a United States federal law which oversees health and safety in both the public and private workplace sectors. Signed into law by President Nixon in 1970, the goal of the law is to ensure the workplace safety of employees, by requiring employers to remove potential hazards such as unsanitary conditions, toxic chemicals, mechanical dangers, and excessive noise.

The legal forerunners of OSHA were introduced with the passing of the Safety Appliance Act in 1893. This was the first federal law to require workplace safety equipment, although it only applied to railroad workers. Later, in 1910, after a series of deadly mine explosions, Congress created the Bureau of the Mines to research improvements in mine safety. With the increased industrial production following World War II, accidents in the workplace soared to an all time high. In the two years preceding the introduction of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, about 14,000 employees died each year from accidents and another 2 million were injured on the job. Additionally, the increase in the use of manufacturing chemicals exposed workers to greater amounts of hazards.

Heightened awareness in the mid 1960’s about the environmental impact of chemical usage increased the public’s interest in protecting worker safety, as exposure to toxins was greater for employees than the environment into which the chemicals were dumped. After President Johnson tried to introduce a comprehensive worker protection bill that later failed, President Nixon proposed OSHA. This compromise bill was less demanding on the employers, although it did utilize the Department of Labor’s ability to enforce employer violations. OSHA officially went into effect on April 28, 1971, which is now celebrated as Worker’s Memorial Day by many American Labor Unions.

OSHA also created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, an agency within the Department of Labor. This Administration has the jurisdiction to create and enforce workplace standards. The Act also formed the independent Occupational Health and Safety Review Commission to review enforcement actions. Finally, OSHA also established the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), another autonomous research organization that forms a part of the Center for Disease Control. By creating independent investigative agencies, OSHA effectively created a systems of bureaucratic checks and balances for the best of worker protection laws and to provide a fair and methodological enforcement of such rules.

[ad_2]

Source by Joseph Devine

[ad_1]

Painting and decorating services are used around the world on a daily basis. They are used in residential and commercial properties and often consist of an experienced team of professionals who provide years of knowledge and experience when it comes to measuring, stripping, filling, preping and painting, just to name a few.

In this service, you are put at risk on a daily basis. While you may not see the painting and decorating services industry as a risky business, you may be surprised to note exactly how many risks you face each day and what you can do to reduce the risk of injury moving forward for you and your team.

Anyone responsible for a team of painters and decorators must hold a health and safety certification and know what to do each day to ensure the best safety measures are in place, reducing the risk of injury and ensuring that everyone working on site, understand the dangers.

The first thing you need is to understanding the risks involved when it comes to painting and decorating services, identifying which of these risks relate to the services you are providing and enabling you to put a risk assessment in place to reduce the risk of injury or harm to you or any of your team throughout the project.

The last thing you want is for one of your team members to injure themselves on the job without adequate training, which could result in a hefty claim against you. The problem is that many company owners don’t realise that in the event of a team member getting injured on site, you can be held responsible and be forced to settle the claim accordingly, which could amount to millions.

The risks involved in this industry include falls from heights, electricity exposure, climbing stairs, eye injuries, cuts, losing limbs, falling objects and sun exposure, just to name a few. Chances are that half of these never even crossed your mind that they may provide hazardous conditions to your team. Other risk involves toxic fumes from paint and equipment use.

The next step once you have been around the project area, identified the potential risks and drawn up a thorough risk assessment is to identify how to reduce the risk of injury or worse while working on this one particular project.

There are some things you can ensure your teams understand, such as paying close attention to detail in everything they do at all times. The next is to ensure all team members complete their health and hygiene courses, providing them with the training they need to ensure the highest level of safety when providing painting and decorating services to clients throughout the area.

Ensure all team members have adequate training when it comes to plant and equipment used. This can reduce the risk of accidents and ensure that everyone using the equipment knows how to use it in a safe and controlled manner.

In addition to this, you may want to consider using water based paints rather than the more toxic paints. Not only is water based paints much easier to clean when it comes to accidental drips and mess, but it also produces less toxic fumes to inhale. You will also want to take the time to read the danger warnings on all paint cans before use.

Ensure that all rooms you are working in are well ventilated, reducing the risk of inhalation. Also get your teams to wash their hands at regular intervals, especially after working closely with certain dangerous chemicals and solvents.

[ad_2]

Source by Tomas Suveizdis

[ad_1]

While the term 'NEBOSH' may sound like a very effective wrestling move, it in reality stands for the well regarded National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health. NEBOSH health and safety has been giving students around Britain certificates along with diplomas in matters of health, safety and environmental issues since the year 1979.

NEBOSH health and safety courses are taken by people around the globe – in 65 nations to be precise. While Nebosh do not do the teaching itself, it does accredit each given organization with the authority to provide the teaching. The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority of England oversee this public body.

Occupational health is a big area and may take in various aspects of the work place. Both the (WHO) World Health Organization as well as the ILO (International Labor Organization) have recognized occupational health as important since 1950.

The term occupational health has been revised twelve times, but the version as it stands places an emphasis on the importance of a safe working environment for staff. It maintains that no activity or aspect of life at work should be negative to the worker. Further to this it states that industrial activities should not negatively affect people outside the place of work – for example, from hazards or pollution caused by working practices / environment. Nebosh health and safety courses help make sure these concepts are widely upheld.

There are 3 guiding principles which support the such an ethos – supported by NEBOSH Health and Safety as well. The initial one is moral – the idea that a worker shouldn't feel under any or be in any danger while they are doing their job. The next one is economic; the financial costs to the country would be much increased if the workplace is a perilous place – namely costs of social security from those injured from a dangerous workplace.

The third of the three is legal. This aspect has no doubt become a more noted reason for better health and safety over the years and decades-an idea that NEBOSH health and Safety also takes into account. Failure to ensure that workers have an safe and adequate working environment can end in legal procedures. Things like fire safety, an absence of physical perils such as heavy things falling on staff or workers, risks of heavy lifting, enough heating (or cooling if needed), good seating; these are just a few of the various aspects to this big area – all of which get covered by NEBOSH health and safety courses.

These courses are given by various independent teaching organizations around Britain as well as the world. It is a good idea to research the institution in question before putting cash down for such a course – maybe finding the feedback of previous students. Some NEBOSH Health and Safety courses are more cost effective than others, but arguably those may have less of a standing in the education and training situation and so high quality should be a loftier aim, instead of price.

[ad_2]

Source by Gino Hitshopi

[ad_1]

Toolbox meeting is part of daily routine for Offshore Oil & Gas Workers. Main reason is to identify hazard and to ensure all safety pre-cautions are in place before and during execution of works. This toolbox meeting is monitored and supervised by Safety Officer. Safety officer is also another interesting jobs. For those who are interested to become one, below are the safety officer roles, responsibilities and qualifications.

  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Assist Management in developing and implementing their HSE plans and advise on operational safety matters related to the works.
  • Co-ordinate and conduct inspections/audits of facilities and activities to ensure compliance to safe and good work practices in accordance to statutory requirement of the Factories and Machinery ACT and all safety Procedures.
  • Have the ability to communicate in written and spoken English & Local language.
  • Give safety presentation with the objective to enhance the Health, safety and Environment awareness of all workers.
  • Assist in accident investigation, reporting and monitor their follow up in accordance to safety procedures.
  • Qualifications
  • Must have 5 years working experience in Supervisory position in the related field of oil and gas industry.
  • Must possess a recognized Diploma in an engineering discipline or a recognized Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) or completed training and assessment by National Institute of Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) and have a minimum of 3 years experience working in OSH or minimum 10 years working experience in OSH.
  • Must have attended the following local safety courses conducted by Safety Training Institution:
  • Supervisory Safety
  • Accident Investigation Skill
  • First Aider
  • Basic Fire Fighting and BA
  • Must have attended the following local courses relevant to their operation:
    • Sea Survival.
    • Crane & lifting operation.
    • Scaffolding inspection
    • Permit to Work System
    • Authorized Gas Tester Certification Course.
    • Helicopter Landing Officer (HLO)
  • Must posses knowledge and skill on:
    • Hazard and effect Management Process/Risk Management
    • HSE cases
    • Emergency response
    • Law, Regulation & Permits
    • HSE Auditing

    There is a popular saying among Offshore Oil and Gas personnel about safety. It is “Come in One Piece & Back in One Piece

    [ad_2]

    Source by Sulaiman Sabur

    [ad_1]

    A Health & Safety (H&S) policy is a written promise of the Business Owners and the Senior Management to provide a healthy and safe workplace. The starting point, the foundation of Health and Safety in the workplace.

    Many Occupational Health & Safety Regulations require that policy is developed, all workers are aware of and be trained on the policy (document, document, document). The policy is posted in the workplace, reviewed at least annually and a program is developed and maintained to implement the policy. This statement provides the regulatory requirement for a Health and Safety Management System (HSMS) in the workplace. Check your local regulatory requirements. We will review the Health and Safety Management System (HSMS) requirements in further detail later in this article.

    Policy Examples

    A quick Google search can provide thousands of examples of Workplace Health & Safety policies to obtain some suggestions to start yours. Please note that this exercise is to view different policies and commitments – We should not just Copy, Cut and Paste. That said, please search Google for these three policies to view a variety of policies. (Not allowed to have links in this article – sorry)

    Bruce Power (Nuclear Power Company) Occupational Health & Safety Policy

    Shell (Oil & Gas Company) Health, Safety & Environment

    IHC (Advocates and Support Services) Health & Safety Policy Statement

    You will notice that these policies from Companies all over the world and vastly different sizes and sectors, but they do have many similar sections.

    Commitment: To provide a healthy and safe workplace for everyone their workers, contractors, and visitors. Meet or exceed the legal requirements.

    The Goal: To eliminate all injuries and illness towards zero harm or injury free.

    Responsibility: Management has accepted their responsibility to provide a healthy and safe workplace. Define that safety is everyone's responsibility – all employees

    The reason for the similarities is due in part by most of these sections being defined in the various regulations and international standards.

    ISO Standard 45001

    One of the international standards that will help improve workplace health & safety is the new ISO (International Standards Organization) 45001. Here is a section taken from the draft standard on the subject of Health and Safety Policies.

    Top management shall establish, implement and maintain an OH&S policy that includes a commitment to provide safe and healthy working conditions for the prevention of work-related injury and / or ill health and is appropriate to the purpose, the size, and context of the organization and to the specific nature of its OH&S risks and OH&S opportunities.

    The standard provides very similar direction contained in the various regulatory and highlights the requirement to ensure the policy is based on the organizations "specific nature of its OH&S risks and OH&S opportunities. While similar in some sections the workplace health and safety policy needs to be workplace specific based on your identified risks, from your risk assessment.

    Health & Safety Management System (HSMS)

    In addition to developing a workplace health and safety policy, the employer is required (in some jurisdictions) to have a program to implement the policy. An HSMS is a collection of policies and procedures based on the specific workplace risks.

    Common Sections – Worker Orientations, First Aid, Wellness, Fire Prevention, Worker Training, Workplace Inspections, Incident & Near Miss Investigations, Hazard Reporting, Indoor Air Quality, Ergonomics, Safe Lifting, Violence & Harassment, Safety Meetings, etc.

    The other sections would be workplace hazard specific and could include sections on, Confined Space Entry, Hot Work Permits, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), Arc Flash, etc.

    The expectation would be that a commitment to provide a healthy and safe workplace is made with the policy and the HSMS is the how you will achieve this.

    Signing Authority

    The policy is signed by the person or persons responsible for ensuring the health and safety of the employees – usually the most senior person – President, Chief Operating Officer, etc. If your company is large with many locations, have the President sign and the most senior person at the facility. You can also invite Union Representatives sign on to the policy and all of your employees.

    The policy should be reviewed and signed each year. Review the policy …

    [ad_1]

    The primary objective of the Occupational Health and Safety Act is to ensure that safety at work is achievable in every organization big or small. By complying with this act, you can address issues that may pose danger to your employees, well before any untoward incidents occur.

    Workplace inspections serve a critical role in fulfilling this objective and in maintaining a safe, productive work environment where your business can flourish. These are planned walk-through activities carried out in the work premises to critically examine various factors. Some of the aspects that may be covered are materials, buildings, equipment and so on which may potentially pose danger.

    One should call in competent, experienced, safety consultants to outline how an effective safety inspection should be carried out for your workplace. Keep in mind that the nature of business, the kind of processes involved here, the kind of equipment being used etc have an impact on which aspects need to be covered during your workplace inspections.

    Planning your Inspections

    To carry out a truly effective inspection, it needs to be thoroughly planned where every important aspect is taken into consideration. Hiring experienced safety consultants is good move because they can bring in their expertise to point out various aspects that you may not have considered. In addition, you can have your own team enrolled in health and safety officer courses with these experts to learn how periodic inspections should be carried out to curb the risks in the workplace.

    Establishing acceptable standards for various workplace activities, processes and the environment, in general, is a key component of workplace safety planning process. With the standards in place, it becomes easier for your employees and your inspectors to quickly identify increased risk in any area well in advance, so that it can be rectified before it causes any harm.

    The Occupational Health and Safety Act Guide has been prepared to assist employers, workers, constructors, supervisors, owners, suppliers, and others who have duties under the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

    The purpose of the OHS Regulation is to promote occupational health and safety and to protect workers and other persons present at workplaces from work-related risks to their health, safety, and well-being.

    The occupational health and safety professional plays a major role in the development and application of accident investigations, risk assessments, loss prevention, and safety training programs for workers. They develop programs that will in conserving life, health and property; improve productivity by implementing loss-control programs in consultation with company and labour officials; identify health and safety hazards in the work environment and advise corrective action.

    [ad_2]

    Source by Amjad Mahmood

    Back to top