Tag: Schools

[ad_1]

Ring the Bell, Yoga is in Session

The rise of attention deficit disorder (ADD), decreasing emphasis on physical fitness, and the increasing stress levels of our children, worry us all. With this in mind, some educational programs and public schools are giving Yoga a chance, by allowing their students to practice from an early age.

Parents who enjoy Yoga are happy to share it with their children. Even the federal government supports efforts: federal Physical Education Program (PEP) grant worth about $750,000 has helped train some 200 teachers nationwide in “Yoga Education.”

According to an article in Education News, in October 2010, Yoga classes for students range from year-long regular exposure, as part of a standard Physical Education class to elective classes, typically less intense and sometimes offered during the school day, or before or after, school. Providing the Yoga instruction costs, on average, $70 per class, but the cost to the school varies depending on students’ ability to pay.

Nonprofit organizations, that recognize the value of Yoga practice, have jumped on the bandwagon to support it. Charitable group, Bent on Learning, raised $325,000 for children’s Yoga in schools in June 2011, through an elite fundraiser, with guests like Gwyneth Paltrow. Other organizations raise funds on a smaller scale or “match make” opportunities between local Yoga instructor volunteers and needy schools.

Best of all, there is definitive proof that Yoga in schools leads to positive outcomes for students. The Program Evaluation and Research Collaborative (PERC) is an independent entity, overseen by California State University, and provides program evaluation and research services to local, state, federal agencies, and schools.

In 2003, they evaluated the “Yoga Ed” program in The Accelerated School (a California charter school). The study subjects were 405 students from kindergarten to 8th grade, and 18 core subject teachers. The Accelerated School is located in South Central Los Angeles, with a student body composed of 62% Hispanic and 36% African-American students.

Highlights of the results of this study are mentioned below.

“Yoga class participation appears to help students’ improve their attitudes toward themselves.

Yoga class participation helped improve students’ behavior.

Yoga class participation helped improve students’ physical health.

Yoga class participation helped students perform better in school academically.”

Conclusion

The introduction of Yoga programs has not been without controversy. Some critics of Yoga see its historic base, in Hindu spirituality, as a conflict with the ban on religious activity in public schools. To avoid this, the Yoga programs have developed alternative terms for components that have traditional names or supposed spiritual aspects. Hence, breathing techniques are now called “balloon breath,” “bunny breathing” and “dragon breath,” for example.

Therefore, if you are a Yoga teacher, who has been invited to teach Yoga in a public school, be aware that extremist objections can possibly surface. In such a case, it may be impossible to reason with the unreasonable. One option for public schools is “Yoga Fitness” or “Stretch and Breathe Classes.” At the very least, our children will learn to be fit, focus on their studies, and deal with daily stress.

© Copyright 2011 – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

[ad_2]

Source by Paul Jerard

[ad_1]

The Orlando schools will be promoting health and wellness to its students this year. As part of the Orange County FL District, the schools in Orlando will implement a new wellness policy that was just approved this month.

The new policy is in response to a federal mandate, under the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004. All schools that receive federal funding for lunch programs must have a wellness policy in place.

The wellness program for the schools in Orlando is designed to promote better health to their students. Healthy eating and physical activity will play a big part in the Orlando policy. The hope is to completely change the environments to healthier ones.

With the new wellness program effective on the first day, each of the schools is challenged to be creative and innovative in implementing wellness activities and promotions.

Each of the schools in Orlando will create a Healthy School Team (HST). The organization of each team is based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Coordinated School Health Model. There will be a member on each HST to represent each of the following areas of health:

o Health education,

o Counseling.

o Psychological and social services,

o School health services,

o Nutrition services,

o Physical education,

o The healthy school environment,

o Health promotion for Orlando schools’ staff, and

o Family and community.

Under the belief that healthy children is a community-wide concern, each of the Orlando schools will enlist the involvement of parents, families, teachers, counselors, school administrators, healthcare professionals, businesses, and community groups and organizations.

The Orange County schools already have experimented with the wellness program, which will benefit the Orlando schools. For almost three years, the program has been used in 13 schools within the county. The HSTs have been found to be quite effective in promoting health and wellness, not only for the students but their families and school staff, as well. The Orlando schools will use much of the information and experiences from these schools, when implementing their own wellness program this year.

The experimental HSTs have sponsored walking and running clubs for students, school staff, and parents. Another example of creative thinking by the HSTs is “wellness Wednesdays”, whereby students are rewarded for being involved in healthy activities, such as eating nutritious lunches, drinking water versus soda, or participating in a physical activity. Each HST at the Orlando schools will be charged with developing activities that meet the specific needs of each school and its students. The HST members are limited only by their own imaginations to develop creative promotions, events and activities.

The new wellness program at the Orlando schools is all about health and wellness for children, and helping everyone concerned to understand the importance of good health and its effect upon a child’s ability to learn. From the federal mandate to the Orlando schools’ implementation of the wellness program, the sole purpose is to improve the health of students in order for them to be better able to learn and achieve — now and in the future.

[ad_2]

Source by Patricia Hawke

[ad_1]

The government has issued new PE objectives to schools indicating that they must increase their structured PE during school time to every child by 2010. They also have to provide an additional 2 hours of out of school PE by 2014. By using real life case studies from successful instructors who are leading the field in developing regular ETM classes and strategies for schools this article explains how to present yourself as an expert, understanding all school ‘s love for acronyms and coding systems and pinpoint who to approach within schools .

Diversification has to be the buzz word in the fitness industry right now. There are so many avenues for the discerning fitness professional to go down within group fitness. These niche markets are in desperate need of the qualified Group Fitness Instructors skills, expertise and knowledge. No longer is teaching in a health club or sports centre the only option. Classes in the community, GP referrals, corporate venues, children, teens and the plus sized market are all MASSIVE opportunities and are relatively untapped areas. We need to start making significant steps towards finding solutions and creating specific programmes for these target groups.

Teaching fitness to children is not the same as teaching to adults so you will need to do a specialist teaching qualification (see the end of this article for course information) as an add onto your existing qualification. Remember you will not be insured to teach under 16’s unless you have a separate specialist qualification. You will also be required to be CRB checked but I am sure your school will be able to help you with this.

But how do you approach schools? who do you approach in schools? and how does it all work?

Liz Hindley owns a highly successful business in Preston, Lancashire called Physikidz (www.physikidz.com) After completing the CAFitness qualification Liz ( who is a mum of 3) began approaching schools with her unique ideas for getting children into exercise. “Leaping Liz” as Liz is known by the children , has developed C.A.T.S (Classroom Aerobics Training System). She identified that children at key stage level 1 and 2 would benefit from doing short simple exercise sessions every day. These sessions are taught in the classroom, without the need to get changed. Leaping Liz visits the participating schools periodically but in the meantime has designed and created all her C.A.T.S routines on a DVD which the teachers play every day for the children.

“The programme I run is operating in Preston (the UKs newest city!) and surrounding areas. I have run INSET days for teachers in Liverpool and Chorley, and spoke about my programme at a conference for SScos at the JJB Stadium in Wigan, which covered the whole of the Northwest. On the back of that and the website, I have sold C.A.T.S (Classroom-based Aerobic Training System) Dvds to schools all around the country.”

Liz is a fully qualified group fitness teacher and I asked her what motivated her to make the push into schools:

“A family friend, a local PDM, was concerned that schools in his partnership were falling short of the 2 hours structured PE that is a Government requirement for 2010, particularly at Key Stage 1. I offered to work with a school in his area to see whether there was a solution to the problem. My simple, short routines were such a hit, that other schools in the area asked me to visit. My alter ego “Leaping Liz” quickly became a local celebrity among teachers and the requests for school visits came flooding in. More than that, I found that I really enjoyed working with these little bundles of energy. I feel that I am really making a difference to the fitness levels of children in our area. They all feel inspired to tell me about their activities – swimming, judo, gymnastics, ballet – between my visits. I am also helping teachers to achieve a simple solution to the problem of fitting more PE into an already packed curriculum. No two schools are the same; no two children are the same. It is challenging, but enormous fun “ Says Liz

But how do you break into the …

Back to top