Tag: Skin

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Melasma is a skin condition that is most often seen in the face. Although it can be present in men, it’s most common in women. It’s commonly found in pregnancy and in women who are on hormone replacement therapy. Melasma often shows itself via hyper pigmentation on the nose, chin, cheeks, and upper lip, although it can appear in other areas. Sometimes, it’s patchy or it shows itself in a spotty appearance. Other times, it just appears to be an area on your face that is darker than other areas. When mine first surfaced, it almost looked like a mustache because the area above my upper lip was noticeably darker. Eventually, it increased to include other areas in my face. And eventually, the dark patches had tiny little white spots within them.

One treatment that I sometimes get asked about is vitamin E. This is a very inexpensive, all natural treatment that can be taken internally or in oral form. Vitamin E is known to be an effective treatment for skin in general because it is a powerful antioxidant. It’s said to offer some protection from ultra violet light (and sun damage,) pollution, and cell damage. It’s also been used as an anti aging ingredient and some believe that it helps with wrinkles and age spots. There’s also some literature which suggest that it can help with inflammation.

Because I have some experience with melasma, I have both researched and tried vitamin E both topically and orally. I could not find any clinical studies or trails that have studied vitamin E as a treatment for hyper pigmentation or this condition. However, I did find a study that mentioned vitamin E within it’s literature and findings.

The study that I’m speaking of was testing the effectiveness of pycnogenol (which is the bark of a plant and extremely powerful anti oxidant) as a treatment for melasma. The study indicated that pycnogenol was believed to recycle vitamin C and regenerate vitamin E within the body. And at the end of the 30 day treatment, pycnogenol was said to have an 80% effective rate. In the literature outlining the study, pycnogenol was noted as more powerful than vitamins C and E. However, since this substance seemed to bump up antioxidant production (including C and E,) you could possibly make some general inferences about these vitamins and the skin.

In my own experience, I believe that vitamin E makes for a powerful topical. It makes my skin look a bit brighter. But, I also did not experience dramatic results in terms of my melasma with it alone. At the end of the day, it became part of my regimen because I believe that, as an antioxidant, it is important for skin. But as a treatment for this type of hyper pigmentation, it’s only my opinion that there are better options. And there are some commercially available products that contain both pycnogenol and vitamin E so that if you believe that treatments based on antioxidant is something that you want to pursue, it’s easy enough to do so while covering all of the bases.

The bottom line for me (and you may certainly disagree) is that treating melasma often requires a combination of many different approaches and a trial and error approach. I’ve heard from people who believe that E may be helping them slightly, but not enough to make significant enough of a difference. Many people chose to stay with it though because it does seem to help with your skin’s overall appearance and it’s inexpensive.

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Source by Susane Dean

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Are you sick of paper thin skin that’s getting older looking by the day? The skin gets thinner and thinner as it ages because the growth of collagen and elastin is reduced. There are creams, lotions, and natural remedies to thicken skin. How effective they are depends on if they effectively can boost your growth of collagen and elastin.

To boost your growth of those vital proteins you need to look at the causes of the reduced growth. Sure, the aging process itself is a big cause. But another big one is nutritional deficiency caused by eating too little nutritious foods or by things that leech nutrients from your body.

To thicken your skin the best thing you can start doing is including lots of nutritious foods in your diet. Especially organic fresh fruit, vegetables, berries, and other whole foods help rejuvenate your skin. A good idea is also to supplement with natural vitamins, minerals, and omega-3.

You should also avoid things that reduce your nutrient absorption. These are things like smoking, stressing, and an excessive alcohol intake. Things like these harm your body and make your skin age much faster.

Now let’s look at what is the best cream for thin skin.

You should use a cream that works to thicken skin naturally by increasing your own growth of collagen and elastin. As you start producing more collagen and elastin your skin will start getting thicker and smoother. In order to find a cream that really works you need to look at the ingredients and find proven effective ones.

Ingredients like cynergy TK, nano-lipobelle H-EQ10, and avocado oil have shown in scientific studies with volunteers to stimulate the production of collagen and elastin, making their skin tighter, healthier and younger looking. These ingredients are completely natural and when used in completely natural skin creams they produce a synergistic effect, giving a much greater anti-aging effect than just the individual benefits.

The best lotions for thin skin don’t only have proven ingredients; they also have the right amounts of them. Many of the creams out there look like they are effective, but when you look closer you discover that the best ingredients are only added in the minimum amount. Such creams are largely ineffective but found everywhere in the market.

To find the best creams for aged thin skin find a company that promises to put the optimal amounts into their products always, no matter how much it costs to manufacture them.

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Source by Ingela M. Johansson

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What causes skin aging?

Simply put, excessive exposure to the sun and exposure to chemicals, such as cigarette smoke, is considered to be the number one cause of aging skin. In fact, did you know that one puff on a cigarette or breathing in second hand smoke introduces several trillion rampaging free radicals into your body, reducing the flow of oxygen to the skin and depleting the body of Vitamin C.

These factors can cause cross-linking of collagen and elastin (the fibers become disorganized bundles instead of fibers that are lined up properly), which often results in a free radical cascade, causing your skin to age.

What are free radicals?

Free radicals are rogue oxygen molecules that cause cellular degeneration of the bodies tissues and, in particularly, aging of the skin. They are created by certain metabolic actions of the body, such as breathing, and can also be introduced through smog, herbicides, pesticides, smoking, radiation, etc.

Free radicals are highly reactive chemicals that have unpaired electrons. This process is called oxidation. Generally, free radicals attack the nearest stable molecule, “stealing” its electron. When the “attacked” molecule loses its electron, it becomes a free radical itself, beginning a chain reaction. Once the process is started, it can cascade, finally resulting in the disruption of living cells. Free radical damage can accumulate with age.

What is an antioxidant?

An antioxidant is an ingredient to counteract oxidation and destroy, neutralize or re-direct free radicals. They act as scavengers, helping to prevent cell and tissue damage that could lead to cellular damage and disease. Antioxidants chemically react with free radicals to convert the rogue oxygen into water. They neutralize free radicals by donating one of their own electrons, ending the electron-“stealing” reaction. Antioxidants are important agents in protecting the cells from oxidative damage caused by rogue oxygen free radicals that can lead to premature aging. Antioxidants can be maintained and processed through eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, taking vitamins and apply antioxidants to your skin.

Some very effective skin care products that contain antioxidants to prevent premature aging are:

Sircuit Cosmeceuticals “weapon ” 10% Vitamin C Antioxidant Therapy Serum

Sircuit “Weapon 10% Serum”

Sircuit Cosmeceuticals “addict” Firming Anti-Oxidant Serum

Sircuit “addict” Antioxidant Serum

Skinceuticals C E Ferulic Serum

Skinceuticals C E Ferulic Serum

Kinerase C6 Peptide Intensive Treatment

Kinerase C6 Peptide Intensive Treatment

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Source by Carey Whitmore

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Gastric-bypass surgery is only the first step many morbidly obese patients take in their total body make overs. One residual of massive weight loss is the dreaded "bat-wings". You know what I'm talking about – that upper arm skin which hangs like bat wings if you spread your arms wide ready for flight. Wave your hand and the bat-wing waves too. For some after massive weight loss there is so much skin it's difficult to find shirts with sleeves that fit, and worse, it's embarrassing to wear sleeveless shirts.

What to do?

Exercise:

The first line of defense is to do weight or strength training during the phase of rapid weight loss. Many patients report satisfactory skin shrinkage of the upper arms when they've incorporated light exercise during weight loss. Bicep curls and tricep pulldowns are the best exercises for firming upper arms. Arm training takes minimal equipment (2 light dumbbells 3-5 lbs each) and limited space. It should be noted, the younger the patient and the fewer times that they've seen significant weight change, the better chance they have toning and shaping their arms with exercise. Now, that does not let older patients off the hook for doing exercise – it just gives a bit more encouragement for younger people who undergo weight loss surgery.

Liposuction:

The next, but not very plausible option is liposuction. Lipo is only appropriate when there is a lot of fat and the skin is tight. The lipo sucks out the fat and allows the skin to shrink. This is not plausible for most WLS patients because they've already lost the fat leaving an empty balloon of upper arm skin.

Brachioplasty:

The last resort is the $ 5,000 arm lift called brachioplasty Brachioplasty is a surgical procedure that eliminates excess skin from the upper arm.

Incisions and Scars in Arm Lift

Scars are the largest drawback of this operation. They will extend from the armpit to the elbow, along the inside of the arm. This operation changes one cosmetic problem (loose skin) for another (scars). In general, those with very loose saggy skin are most likely to find this exchange worthwhile. Those with a small amount of looseness will probably not want the scars.

Kaye Bailey © 2005 – All Rights Reserved

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Source by Kaye Bailey

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