Tag: Sports

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Conditioning is a word that is used a lot in the fitness industry but what does it really mean to have conditioning? There are those that are ripped from strength conditioning, marathon runners have to go through a type of stamina conditioning and then there is the conditioning that is necessary for fighters and martial artists.

Conditioning can come off as this hard core concept of hard work and training to build your body up so it can perform or endure what the sport demands of it.

And it’s true.

However, that is not the whole picture of what it means to be a conditioned athlete. Building your body and it’s performance potentials is only the outcome associated to having “great conditioning”.

The other half of the definition of conditioning is more about the discipline, the standard and the values that you adopt.

“Great conditioning” is the result of adopting and integrating habits, standards and values that slowly, over time changes and transforms the conditions of the body.

Conditioning isn’t so much about building yourself up but rather more about adopting a specific way of being that will serve you in the long run which is beneficial for the performance and execution of the skills in a given sport or physical activity.

So, how do you integrate a great conditioning ritual? One that will meet your athletic needs based on the sport or physical activity of your choice?

A good place to start is by looking at where your values are placed in your sport. By looking at the components that you already have a natural inclination to favour and value, then you have a platform where you can design for yourself a discipline that you are more than likely to commit to.

If for example you naturally favour cardio, then use that as a base to develop a discipline to condition, not only great cardio but also as a way to condition better form, more strength and greater endurance doing the activity that is the source of cardio. It’s also a great way to develop secondary attributes. If, for instance you typically rely on jogging for cardio but you would like to develop another physical skill or work on some upper body, than you might consider cardio boxing. Or you might want to develop better foot co-ordination and do some skip rope.

By focusing on what you already prefer, you are much more likely to build on it and develop a discipline and from a place of discipline is where conditioning can flow from the best.

Also, using discipline is a powerful way to predispose yourself to growth and improvement in a specific skill or attribute. Once you have established a discipline on a particular practice, then it’s only a matter of pushing yourself and upping the ante in order to improve and refine that conditioning.

Let me leave with one final thought, and that is, when thinking in terms of the type of conditioning you feel you may need for whatever fitness goal that you have, think about what habits you need to adopt and how you need to be in the process of the training rather than what you need to do to reach and achieve a goal to finally arrive at. Chances are that when you arrive at that goal, in order to maintain it, you will need to sustain the conditioning by maintaining the practice that got you there in the first place.

Conditioning is a process.

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Source by Clinton Boucheix

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The 8 Training Principles are research-based guidelines that can help you accelerate your training progress and optimize your results. Knowing how to apply these principles gives you an educated basis on which you can make informed decisions about designing your fitness or sports training program. The principles can also help you evaluate the merits of fitness equipment and personal training services.

All of the principles complement each other. For best results, they should be applied in concert throughout every phase of training.

1. Principle of Specificity suggests that your body will make adjustments according to the type of training you perform and in the very same muscles that you exercise. How you train determines what you get.

This principle guides you in designing your fitness training program. If your goal is to improve your overall level of fitness, you would devise a well-rounded program that builds both endurance and overall body strength. If you want to build the size of your biceps, you would increase weight loads on bicep curls and related exercises.

2. The Principle of Overload implies that you must continually increase training loads as your body adapts over time. Because your body builds and adjusts to your existing training regimen, you must gradually and systematically increase your work load for continued improvement.

A generally accepted guideline for weight training is to increase resistance not more than 10% per week. You can also use percentages of your maximum or estimated maximum level of performance and work out within a target training zone of about 60-85% of maximum. As your maximum performance improves, your training loads will increase, as well.

3. The Principle of Recovery assets that you must get adequate rest between workouts in order to recuperate. How much rest you need depends upon your training program, level of fitness, diet, and other factors.

Generally, if you perform a total body weight workout three days per week, rest at least 48 hours between sessions. You can perform cardio more frequently and on successive days of the week.

Over time, too little recovery can result in signs of overtraining. Excessively long periods of recovery time can result in a detraining effect.

4. The Principle of Reversibility refers to the loss of fitness that results after you stop training. In time, you will revert back to your pre-training condition. The biological principle of use and disuse underlies this principle. Simply stated, If you don’t use it, you lose it.

While adequate recovery time is essential, taking long breaks results in detraining effects that may be noticeable within a few weeks. Significant levels of fitness are lost over longer periods. Only about 10% of strength is lost 8 weeks after training stops, but 30-40% of endurance is lost in the same time period.

The Principle of Reversibility does not apply to skills. The effects of stopping practice of motor skills, such as weight training exercises and sport skills, are very different. Coordination appears to store in long-term motor memory and remains nearly perfect for decades. A skill once learned is never forgotten.

5. The Principle of Variation implies that you should consistently change aspects of your workouts. Training variations should always occur within ranges that are aligned with your training directions and goals. Varying exercises, sets, reps, intensity, volume, and duration, for example, prevents boredom and promotes more consistent improvement over time. A well-planned training program set up in phases offers built-in variety to workouts, and also prevents overtraining.

6. The Principle of Transfer suggests that workout activities can improve the performance of other skills with common elements, such as sport skills, work tasks, or other exercises. For example, performing explosive squats can improve the vertical jump due to their common movement qualities. But dead lifting would not transfer well to marathon swimming due to their very dissimilar movement qualities.

7. The Principle of Individualization suggests that fitness training programs should be adjusted for personal differences, such as abilities, skills, gender, experience, motivation, past injuries, and physical condition. While general principles and best practices are good guides, each person’s unique qualities must be part of the exercise equation. There is no one size fits all training program.

8.

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Combat Conditioning was the first book that introduced me to body weight exercises for functional strength and endurance. I was the type of kid in high school sports that was the proverbial “no talent ass clown.” What I mean by this was that I was very strong but natural talent escaped me. I always vowed that there are people that are much more talented but I would never be out worked. Growing up in the work out craze of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s “Pumping Iron” movie got me into weight lifting with all my friends. Now when you are young and you simple pound out weights to see how strong you are, bad things end up happening. When I received a physical before the starting season of Varsity football, the doctor looked at me and politely said – “Hey idiot, have you ever heard of stretching”? Needless to say the quest began to look for a better way to exercise and gain functional strength. Lawyer Note: I hate these but they are important. With any exercise routines, please check with your Doctor’s to make sure you are able to perform these routines.

Why is this important to me?

This book will help you acquire knowledge on body weight exercises that help in three areas: Strength, Endurance and Flexibility. If these three things are not important to you then please save yourself 5 minutes and shut off the video. Otherwise please continue on with me.

Have you ever seen any of the following: Great MMA fighters, cirque du soleil or a gymnastics competition? All of these phenomenal athletes have functional strength. This means that they can do things with their body that 90 percent of the population cannot. The good news is that 90 percent can do these things if they change up on their exercise routines. Another book you should check out is Convict Conditioning. This focused more on muscle, joint and tendon strength. What is beneficial about that is you can keep that strength well into your seventies.

Don’t get me wrong – any type of exercise is better than none. If you are doing nothing and start doing weight lifting then please keep doing it. But if you want a cheap way to work out with compound results then this book is for you. One big problem with weight lifting by itself is that it utilizes muscle isolation. This means that if you do curling then you isolate the movement to the bicep muscle. This does nothing to create functional strength for your tendons or joints. The human body was engineered to work together so why not shorten your work out and do compound exercises to maximize your results. If you did a simple pull up then you still exercise your bicep but you also engage your back, forearms, shoulders and core along with creating functional strength.

Matt describes his Holy Grail of working out which he coins the Royal Court. I will explain each exercise.

The Hindu squat is an excellent exercise. When you start out you can do a half squat like with your arms in front of you parallel to the floor but as you progress and build up strength in your knees, you will want to do a full squat with the back of your thighs touching the back of your calves.

Strong legs do a body good. When you work on your legs, you engage the whole body and burn calories all day even after the work out. The legs consist of the biggest muscles in your body and it shows the next day when they are sore.

When doing Hindu squats, work up to doing three sets of 100. Doing the royal court in 3 set cycles is a great work out that does not take much time. If you travel then this is a perfect routine because it does not take long at all.

The Hindu pushup is different than a regular pushup. Start with your feet a bit wider than shoulder width apart and your butt in the air. Push through in an arcing motion(similar to downward facing dog in Yoga). Try to work up to 3 sets of 50 repetitions. …

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