Tag: Staying

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Some are born with an inbuilt knowledge of what one’s body needs. Others are easily misguided and led by fashion, popularity, and peer pressure into things that should be avoided. There is also the bodies willingness or otherwise to partake of harmful substances. In my case my body could not tolerate chemicals or anything that affected the brain. This was guided by my keen desire for knowledge and making my intelligence number one.

The lessons learned are that what we do when we are young has an impact on aging and on what diseases and handicaps we will face as the years pile up. Good body maintenance is about avoiding anything toxic and that includes even dangerous rides at carnivals.

The latest fad is to take rides on vehicles that cause a drop and sudden stop, as in some crazy fairground roller coaster adventures. Watching one of these recently it was hard for me to believe that people not only put their own bodies at risk but that of their children in the name of having fun. The human brain is soft and very easily damaged.

The body warns of impending danger through the adrenalin glands and the sensation that many find addictive. As adrenalin flows it increases the heart rate and provides us with a flight or fight experience. In other words, it prepares for recovery from harm.

As the body jerks into a sudden stop the cranium and brain collide. This causes a degree of bruising and can even result in death or paralysis. But that doesn’t have to happen immediately as delayed response may see the effects of concussion several hours or even a day after the event.

Headaches; nausea; dizziness; memory problems; irritability; as well as balance and sleeping difficulties may follow. Look at these symptoms and compare them to those of Alzheimer’s or dementia patients. With the latter there are huge changes in brain functions that include memory loss.While there is no proven correlation to support the linking of the two it doesn’t mean it is not correct.

Drugs also affect the brain and taking pills on a regular basis may also be leading to the onset of Alzheimer’s or dementia. While there are no studies to prove this is the case it’s still a matter of common sense.

If one is looking for a fitness regime then start with the brain and all other things will surely follow. It has the ability to tell us when we are going wrong. Drugs, on the other hand, interfere with that side of nature. We educate the brain by what we do to our bodies. If we stuff ourselves with things like sweets and alcohol, and tell it that the odd adrenalin rush is OK, then changes in that vital organ will impel us to take more of it.

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Source by Norma Holt

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Are you facing mid-life feeling sluggish, fatigued and generally overweight? Don’t assume that it’s all downhill from here. You can stay fit and healthy well into old age – if you decide to make some important lifestyle changes. Now is the time to take action!

Ask yourself the following questions:-

  1. Why do some people fare better in old age than others?
  2. Why is it that some people in their 70s and 80s are able to lead a healthy and active life, free from disease, whilst others become frail and dependent on family members?

Could it be down to luck – or does it have anything to do with the lifestyle choices they have made?

It is true that some people may have a genetic disposition to illness that can not be easily prevented. However, the majority of people who suffer from age related illness may not have given enough attention to their overall health, especially during their mid-life years.

Aging has an impact on our health and vitality. We know that at around age 35 our heart rate begins to dip slightly. Between the ages of 47-51 most women begin to experience life changes associated with the menopause. As we progress past our 50s, our memory, balance and muscle mass begin to wane.

Regardless of general ageing, the main cause of many illnesses is largely due to poor diet, harmful levels of stress and a lack of physical and mental exercise. By choosing to change bad mid-life habits into good ones, you can delay or even prevent illnesses like, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and dementia.

Below the age of 40 it is possible, to some extent, to get away with poor lifestyle choices. Excess alcohol intake, smoking and a poor diet are largely compensated for by the youthful body. After 40 though, you need to take greater care of yourself. If you have arrived at age 40, with the belief that it is normal to lose physical fitness and gain weight, then your mindset may encourage what is known as middle age spread. In reality, this is an increase in visceral fat, often linked to high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and strokes.

Research has shown that between the age of 40 and 60, at least two-thirds of the UK population will suffer with some form of chronic health issue, or at least one long-term illness. Yet, to a large degree, many of these diseases can be avoided.

Mid-life is definitely not a downhill course. Instead, it gives you the chance to view life with a more positive outlook. You owe it to yourself to develop a greater chance of having an active and disease-free lifestyle, while living to a ripe old age.

Here are 4 suggestions that you can work on, if you want to avoid the risk of a debilitating disease later in life.

Take care of your teeth and gums – This may seem obvious, but oral hygiene plays a major part in our long-term health, especially as we age. Brushing and flossing after meals can help to prevent inflammation and the buildup of plaque in both the gums and body. Blood vessels which supply blood and oxygen to the heart and brain can become narrowed or restricted when plaque is present in the body. This can lead to a heart attack, stroke or early onset of dementia. Keeping your teeth & gums healthy can significantly improve your health.

Maintain a healthy diet – Ensure that the food you eat has a positive effect on overall health. Always check food labels to ensure products are low in salt, sugar and saturated fats. Foods high in these will raise your bad cholesterol, clog your arteries and increase your risk of diseases. A diet rich in lean protein, fresh fruit, vegetables and oily fish can guarantee you good health. Try to prepare and cook your own meals as often as possible. There are several good cookery books and programmes which show how to make healthy meals within minutes. Drink plenty of water daily and reduce your alcohol intake.

Exercise your mind and body regularly – It is never too late to start taking part …

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