Tag: Suggestions

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In a new work supported by USA Triathlon (USAT), the governing body for triathlon and related multi-sport competitions, eighteen senior world champion triathletes offer bright-side strategies for minimizing frailties and maximizing possibilities for wellbeing, particularly exuberance, physical fitness, mental acuity, happiness and joy, meaning and relevance.

A treasure trove of 66 uncommon but plausible tips that, if practiced, should make life better (healthier), more enjoyable and more attractive. Not Dead Yet seeks to render getting older less daunting and more appealing for all who are, or want to be old someday, though not too soon!

Not Dead Yet provides what you must know about aging and thriving but may have been too polite or nervous to ask, not realizing that thriving at this stage of life was a realistic option. The focus of this work is upon positive, largely under-appreciated opportunities that can make the later years the best of times, by far. The humor and wit of the accomplished perennial triathletes, the eloquent words of Robert Green Ingersoll throughout and chapters on REAL wellness, frailty and death, meaning and purpose, epiphanies, fun, staying relevant and what’s left should appeal to readers of all ages.

The focus of Not Dead Yet is different from books on aging which overwhelmingly focus on medical advice oriented to frailties, illnesses and the looming presence of death, not successful adaptation to older age. The tips and other material in Not Dead Yet complement sound medical counsel, particularly with respect to the prevention of the usual difficulties, but the difference is dramatic because the focus goes beyond coping to exuberant living. Not Dead Yet tips represent an upbeat message; the commentaries do not focus on the dark side of aging. The participating champions don’t deny any of it, but they don’t dwell upon any of it, either.

While much valuable information about the difficult facts and dynamics of aging is common knowledge, the absence of the positive side of being in or near the retirement years tends to discourage older populations, not encourage positive actions that will improve health status. The emphasis in this book is on action – forward-moving attitudinal and behavioral advice.

In short, Not Dead Yet is wholly designed to foster proactive health-enhancing actions that add wellbeing and enjoyment beyond the absence of discomfort, limitations and suffering. The challenges of aging are well known, especially those dealing with negative changes physical and mental. The tips embrace the bright side of senior life, practical ways to bring a bit of Spring and Summer to the Fall of existence.

Readers will surely enjoy and act upon the words of wisdom from these senior champions and ponder their many recommended steps for success at aging. These writers want you to make the most of opportunities associated with being mature, wiser than ever and perhaps retired with more time to do what you want to do, with whom and when in ways you prefer to go about it. Elder life situations are rich with under-appreciated possibilities to do more while complaining and suffering less.

The ideas on aging comport with something the great American 19th century orator Robert Green Ingersoll (1833-1899) said of happiness, namely, that the time to be happy is now, the place to be happy is here and the way to be happy is to make others so. While we cannot directly make others happy, we can and are seeking, with Not Dead Yet, to provide sparkling tips and commentaries that will brighten the time remaining for all readers. We believe we can do this to some extent by inciting action on the part of readers to do more that can readily be done to enjoy good health and happiness, love and joyful living in the time remaining.

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Source by Donald Ardell

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Years ago, during a rough patch in life, I started seeing a behavioral psychologist to deal with some anxiety issues and insomnia. Part of his sessions often consisted of a guided meditation, where he would speak to me in gentle tones while I lay on the sofa, breathing deeply. The meditations were probably a good 20 minutes or so, and frankly, I wondered if perhaps these sessions were just a way for my therapist to get a break from listening to my life nonsense, but I found them very relaxing and left afterwards feeling calm and refreshed, two feelings that didn’t come naturally to me.

After one session, my therapist complimented me on my breathing. He noted that I could slow my breath down and take very long, deep breaths that helped me reach a different state. Higher consciousness? Maybe. Calm and relaxed? Definitely, at least during and for a bit after the meditation. He asked if I had learned this somewhere. I told him about the years I had spent taking Kundalini Yoga from a prominent LA teacher. It wasn’t daily training, just a class or two a week with a bunch of other students in a studio or in the instructor’s living room.

“Breath of Fire” (very rapid in and out breath through the nose and controlled by the diaphragm) and techniques that included filling your lungs with as much air as possible (or blowing ALL the air out of your lungs and keeping them empty – always much harder), and then doing yoga while holding the air in or out is the kind of training that can improve breathing technique. There were also gong meditations, lying on your back, eyes closed, and breathing deeply while the instructor bangs on a large gong, which you hear as well as feel (sound waves) for the duration of the meditation.

My therapist then suggested, that as a massage therapist and massage therapy instructor, I might also teach people how to breathe. So, with that in mind, here are a few thoughts for those of you who want to incorporate a meditation practice into your life to reap its proven positive benefits, including:

· When to meditate and how often

· Creating a good mediation environment

· What you need to meditate

· Mantra or no mantra?

· Deep breathing techniques

· Clearing the mind (what to think about… or not)

· Benefits of Mediation

· “Mindfulness.” What does it really mean?

1. PICK A GOOD TIME AND START SMALL

Did you know that the Buddha sat under the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa in Latin, which sounds like a Hermoine spell from Harry Potter) with the intention of remaining there until he achieved enlightenment? How long he actually sat is not entirely clear, but may have been weeks. Without food.

Good news: you don’t need to do that.

Start small. Most people who meditate “religiously” (it is spiritual, sometimes, but not necessarily religious, although even the Big 3 religions refer to silent or personal prayer as “meditation”) do so in the morning upon waking (and some do, in fact, get up at 4:30 for “sadna,” a pre-dawn meditation practiced by some Sikhs, when the spiritual energy is supposed to b especially strong), and then again in the late afternoon or early evening (before or after dinner is great).

Deep breathing before bed is a good way to relax, but a full meditation right before bed is not advisable because that might trick your body and brain into thinking you’ve slept enough already. And while early morning meditation seem to be fantastic for many, be realistic about yourself. Don’t make yourself get up at 5 or 6 to meditate if you hate getting up early. Do it when it’s convenient and easy for you, and then you’ll be more likely to keep doing it!

As for meditating for a week (or more) without food and water like the Buddha, this isn’t recommended for beginners or even the experienced. For most people, 15-20 minutes is a good session, but even five minutes is beneficial, and some long-time practitioners will do longer mediations. Starting out, five minutes is a good number because …

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