Tag: Syndrome

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Osteoarthritis is the breakdown of cartilage, a spongy protein that covers the ends of the bones within a joint. Normal cartilage helps with shock absorption by serving as a cushion at the ends of the bones. The cartilage as the fluid within the joint allows for smooth joint movement. As osteoarthritis progresses, the space between the bones narrows, the cartilage wears down and the underlying bone is exposed. This results in painful movement of the joint as well as limited motion. Bone spurs can develop around the joint, limiting motion further and contributing to more pain. Inflammation plays only a minor role in osteoarthritis.

There are many causes of osteoarthritis, the most well known is the aging process. As we age, the water content of cartilage increases and the protein content decreases. As the water content increases, the cartilage becomes softer, more permeable and loses it’s mechanical properties. The protein content decreases which contributes to slow degeneration of the cartilage, resulting in flaking and erosions.

Other causes of osteoarthritis include abnormal bone alignment. In the foot, the most common cause is faulty foot mechanics. When the foot is not in alignment and not functioning properly, this causes abnormal stress on joints in the foot, ankle, knee, hip and back. Trauma is a well known cause of arthritis. Direct trauma can disturb the joint structures, cause mal-alignment of the joint or cause weakness of the surrounding structures, resulting in instability of the joint and eventual osteoarthritis. Other causes, such as infection, medications (such as steroids) and genetics contribute to the development of arthritis.

Obesity is a common cause of arthritis. The exact mechanism of how excess weight influences osteoarthritis is unclear. Although the excess load placed on joint surfaces will accelerated the breakdown of cartilage, obesity is also correlated with osteoarthritis of the hand, indicating a more systemic cause. Obesity increases the chances of having metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a condition characterized by a set of risk factors which are linked to coronary artery disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. The risk factors include high blood pressure, abdominal obesity (fat around the waist), abnormal cholesterol levels (such as high triglyceride levels & low HDL levels) and insulin resistance (which corresponds with high blood sugar). The underlying theories of metabolic syndrome are tied to the body’s metabolism, most likely insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the cells inability to efficiently use insulin, a hormone which transports sugar from the bloodstream to the cells. The result is high blood sugar. Insulin resistance is correlated to weight gain and inactivity.

In a recent study in the journal Skeletal Radiology, popliteal artery wall thickness was evaluated in individuals with osteoarthritis. Forty-two patients who were diagnosed with osteoarthritis at multiple joints were compared to 27 patients without osteoarthritis (the control group). An MRI of the knee was used to evaluate vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery. The osteoarthritis group had thicker vessel walls than the control group, even when the researchers made adjustments for gender, weight and age. Because vessel wall thickness is directly related to high blood pressure and peripheral and coronary artery disease, the authors suggest that osteoarthritis might be another facet of metabolic syndrome.

One theory to explain the link between osteoarthritis and metabolic syndrome is based on white blood cells, immune fighting cells, increasing in areas where fat accumulates, especially around the abdomen (abdominal obesity). As the white blood cells increase, they contribute to widespread inflammation in the body, causing a pro-inflammatory state (as indicated by high blood levels of C- reactive protein) and the production of immune chemicals (specifically cytokines) which cause a chain reaction resulting in damage to the cartilage. The combination of insulin resistance and the pro-inflammatory state may also affect the normal cartilage repair process.

It is possible that osteoarthritis might be an inevitable outcome for those with metabolic syndrome.

Kornaat PR et al. Positive association between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis: is OA also part of the metabolic syndrome? Skeletal Radiol. 2009 Jul 3.
Rojas-Rodríguez J, et al. The relationship between the metabolic syndrome and energy-utilization deficit in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced osteoarthritis. Med Hypotheses. 2007;69(4):860-8.
Cicuttini FM, Baker JR, Spector …

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So, if you suffer from IBS (or irritable bowel), one of the biggest questions you always face is – What can you eat? What diet will not flare up your symptoms? And what foods will actually help & heal your stomach?

There are many theories and diet programs that have been proposed for Irritable Bowel. In this article I'll examine the main ones I've tried, and then share what has worked for me in my 5 years of first hand research with this condition.

There are no Right or Wrong Foods

The first biggest myth I have to debunk right now, is that of "right foods". The truth is that there is no right or wrong food.

And every digestive system is unique. And every condition is unique. So, what may have worked for others may not work for you. On the other hand, what works for you may not work for others.

In this article, and the book you may choose to buy, I'll share some of the common foods and recipes that have been known to work. But the key thing in looking for the right diet with Irritable Bowel is to do this with a sense of experimentation. Track your diet and see what works for you, under what condition.

The other thing is that the food is sometimes related to the problem you're facing at the moment. For example, if you're experiencing gassiness at the moment – it's obviously best to avoid foods that would aggravate that.

Do Soluble Fibers Help Digestion?

You may have read in several books that foods rich in soluble fibers taken in small quantities over time can help IBS patients stabilize their digestive systems. Since it's one of the most popular theories out there, I gave it a good, hearty shot.

In my case, soluble fibers didn't help too much – although they didn't hurt either. I've read of several case studies where long term use of soluble fibers has helped improve the strength of the digestive system. In my case, they may have helped slightly – but a huge difference.

My advice to you is to try out soluble fibers – if it hurts, stop within the week. If it helps (or is neutral), then continue this as a lifestyle habit. Make soluble fibers part of 1 or 2 meals each day. So, it may be a safe bet to eat these foods when in doubt:

* Oat / Oat bran

* Dried beans and peas

* Nuts

* Barley

* Flax seed

* Fruits such as oranges and apples

* Vegetables such as carrots

* Psyllium husk

The acid-alkaline balance

Our body has a sensitive balance of acid and acidic content. This is known as the pH balance (you probably remember it from 9th grade chemistry). Usually when we lose this balance we end up getting acidity.

The problem is that almost everything we eat is acidic! Most meat, breads, coffee, soft drinks, and even fruits are acidic … So, how can regain your alkaline balance?

The easiest way is to drink lots of water. Yes, 2-3 liters of water each day will dilute the acidic effect and keep your pH balance normal. If you want to go one step further, drink alkaline drinks. This includes green tea, barley, wheat grass, lemon water, mango / watermelon / apple / guava juice and herb teas.

In the Goodbye IBS! book & bonuses, you'll find a handy cheat sheet of alkaline foods you can print and stick around the house. This will remind you to fill your diet with alkaline foods that constantly balance your pH. (you can find a mini-version of that bonus report at this URL – [http://goodbyeibs.com/diet])

Fresh, Vegetarian Food Is The Easiest To Digest

Have you every left cooked meat outside, in the eat for 72 hours? You know what happens to it … it starts, attracts acterial growth and you generally throw it away, right?

Well, did you know it takes red meat 60-72 hours to pass through your digestive system? And your stomach is hotter and more humid than any environment outside … just imagine what your digestive system has to put through to …

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