Tag: Teach

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The government has issued new PE objectives to schools indicating that they must increase their structured PE during school time to every child by 2010. They also have to provide an additional 2 hours of out of school PE by 2014. By using real life case studies from successful instructors who are leading the field in developing regular ETM classes and strategies for schools this article explains how to present yourself as an expert, understanding all school ‘s love for acronyms and coding systems and pinpoint who to approach within schools .

Diversification has to be the buzz word in the fitness industry right now. There are so many avenues for the discerning fitness professional to go down within group fitness. These niche markets are in desperate need of the qualified Group Fitness Instructors skills, expertise and knowledge. No longer is teaching in a health club or sports centre the only option. Classes in the community, GP referrals, corporate venues, children, teens and the plus sized market are all MASSIVE opportunities and are relatively untapped areas. We need to start making significant steps towards finding solutions and creating specific programmes for these target groups.

Teaching fitness to children is not the same as teaching to adults so you will need to do a specialist teaching qualification (see the end of this article for course information) as an add onto your existing qualification. Remember you will not be insured to teach under 16’s unless you have a separate specialist qualification. You will also be required to be CRB checked but I am sure your school will be able to help you with this.

But how do you approach schools? who do you approach in schools? and how does it all work?

Liz Hindley owns a highly successful business in Preston, Lancashire called Physikidz (www.physikidz.com) After completing the CAFitness qualification Liz ( who is a mum of 3) began approaching schools with her unique ideas for getting children into exercise. “Leaping Liz” as Liz is known by the children , has developed C.A.T.S (Classroom Aerobics Training System). She identified that children at key stage level 1 and 2 would benefit from doing short simple exercise sessions every day. These sessions are taught in the classroom, without the need to get changed. Leaping Liz visits the participating schools periodically but in the meantime has designed and created all her C.A.T.S routines on a DVD which the teachers play every day for the children.

“The programme I run is operating in Preston (the UKs newest city!) and surrounding areas. I have run INSET days for teachers in Liverpool and Chorley, and spoke about my programme at a conference for SScos at the JJB Stadium in Wigan, which covered the whole of the Northwest. On the back of that and the website, I have sold C.A.T.S (Classroom-based Aerobic Training System) Dvds to schools all around the country.”

Liz is a fully qualified group fitness teacher and I asked her what motivated her to make the push into schools:

“A family friend, a local PDM, was concerned that schools in his partnership were falling short of the 2 hours structured PE that is a Government requirement for 2010, particularly at Key Stage 1. I offered to work with a school in his area to see whether there was a solution to the problem. My simple, short routines were such a hit, that other schools in the area asked me to visit. My alter ego “Leaping Liz” quickly became a local celebrity among teachers and the requests for school visits came flooding in. More than that, I found that I really enjoyed working with these little bundles of energy. I feel that I am really making a difference to the fitness levels of children in our area. They all feel inspired to tell me about their activities – swimming, judo, gymnastics, ballet – between my visits. I am also helping teachers to achieve a simple solution to the problem of fitting more PE into an already packed curriculum. No two schools are the same; no two children are the same. It is challenging, but enormous fun “ Says Liz

But how do you break into the …

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Mandalas are geometric patterns starting from a central dot, working outward in repetitive patterns, often integrating symbols and vibrant colour. A circle within a circle is a universal pattern full of symbolic meaning. It is simple yet contains an element of the eternal. Mandalas remind us of our relation to the infinite world both beyond and within our bodies and minds.

There are numerous ways to teach kids and teens about the beauty, complexity, universal nature and healing powers of mandalas. Three of which will be discussed here along with specific examples and applications.

Explore Mandalas in Nature

Mandalas are all around us. One simply has to walk through a garden to find beautiful flowers in bloom and appreciate their circular, repetitive patterns. Increasing awareness of the many manifestations of mandalas in nature can begin by examining an atom. Each cell is a mandala. On a grander scale the universe with the rotation of the planets around the sun or the shape of the galaxies and other cosmic manifestations demonstrate mandalas as a fundamental form. Mandalas are present in almost all scientific studies from geology and biology to physics and chemistry. Becoming aware of their ever present nature allows individuals to find mandalas in previously unrecognized locations.

Examine the Universal Cultural Use of Mandalas

Mandalas are found throughout the world. From Tibetan monks who create sand mandalas as a form of devotion, to Navajo sand painting used during complex healing ceremonies, mandalas are present in nearly every culture and religion. Showing kids and teens the universal nature of this art form helps to build connections and cultural understanding. Two easy ways to teach the use of mandalas by different groups include:

  1. Research Project: Providing a list of cultures/religions (Buddhist, Hindu, Christian, Celtic, MesoAmerican, Aboriginal, etc), allow children to search for the use of mandalas by that culture/religion. This is highly effective in partners or small groups where each group is assigned one culture and then asked to present their findings to the class.
  2. Matching Game: Using photos of various mandalas and a world map, match the mandala with its geographic location, include a discussion on the similarities and differences.

Create Personal Mandalas

Once kids and teens have a basic understanding of mandalas, creating their own mandala allows for ownership and integration of the principles being taught.

Personal Mandalas: Often personal mandalas are used as a form of meditation or colour therapy and assist in calming the mind and nourishing the soul. Producing specific, multicoloured mandalas is a creative and individual process. Any variety of medium can be used including sand, shells, tiles, string, chalk, collage, crayons, paints, glass, fabric, etc. However, it is important to maintain the shape and repetitive geometric patterns classic to mandalas.

Group Mandalas: Similarly group mandalas offer many personal rewards but also incorporate cooperation and teamwork. These are wonderful expressions to celebrate workshops, events or special celebrations. Connections are strengthened and the use of symbolism explored as a group works together to create a representation of their time together.

Mandalas are powerful. Their presence throughout nature and use by many cultures demonstrate their connection with humanity and the universe. Teaching kids and teens about mandalas helps them to more fully understand the world and themselves.

Visit Mandalas Universal Across Cultures for visuals and explanations of the use of mandalas by a variety of cultural and religious groups.

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Source by Donna K Freeman

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