Tag: Whats

The Difference Between Concierge Medicine and Direct Primary Care

Direct primary care (DPC) is a term often linked to its companion in health care, ‘concierge medicine.’ Although the two terms are similar and belong to the same family, concierge medicine is a term that fully embraces or ‘includes’ many different health care delivery models, direct primary care being one of them.

Similarities

DPC practices, similar in philosophy to their concierge medicine lineage – bypass insurance and go for a more ‘direct’ financial relationship with patients and also provide comprehensive care and preventive services for an affordable fee. However, DPC is only one branch in the family tree of concierge medicine.

DPC, like concierge health care practices, remove many of the financial barriers to ‘accessing’ care whenever care is needed. There are no insurance co-pays, deductibles or co-insurance fees. DPC practices also do not typically accept insurance payments, thus avoiding the overhead and complexity of maintaining relationships with insurers, which can consume as much as $0.40 of each medical dollar spent (See Sources Below).

Differences

According to sources (see below) DPC is a ‘mass-market variant of concierge medicine, distinguished by its low prices.’ Simply stated, the biggest difference between ‘direct primary care’ and retainer based practices is that DPC takes a low, flat rate fee whereas omodels, (although plans may vary by practice) – usually charge an annual retainer fee and promise more ‘access’ to the doctor.

According to Concierge Medicine Today (MDNewsToday), the first official news outlet for this marketplace, both health care delivery models are providing affordable, cost-effective health care to thousands of patients across the U.S. MDNewsToday is also the only known organization that is officially tracking and collecting data on these practices and the physicians — including the precise number of concierge physicians and practices throughout the U.S.

“This primary care business model [direct primary care] gives these type of providers the time to deliver more personalized care to their patients and pursue a comprehensive medical home approach,” said Norm Wu, CEO of Qliance Medical Management based in Seattle, Washington. “One in which the provider’s incentives are fully aligned with the patient’s incentives.”

References and Sources

“Doc This Way!: Tech-Savvy Patients and Pros Work Up Healthcare 2.0”. New York Post. 4/7/2009.

Who Killed Marcus Welby? from Seattle’s The Stranger, 1/23/2008

“Direct Medical Practice – The Uninsured Solution to the Primary Medical Care Mess” with Dr. Garrison Bliss (Qliance Medical Group of WA).

“Direct Primary Care: A New Brew In Seattle”. Harvard Medical School – WebWeekly. 2008-03-03.

DPCare.org

Qliance.com

ConciergeMedicineToday.com

Source by Michael Tetreault

Wearable tech looks like a trend that won’t be wearing out soon. Just recently, TomTom has released their new product range, the TomTom Spark. With multisport capabilities (running, cycling, pool swimming), activity tracking, built-in heart rate monitor, and music player, it maybe the all-in-one wearable tech most runners are looking for.

This latest upgrade sort of blends the TomTom Runner and the TomTom Multisport into one watch and adding the latest tech that are becoming a standard feature set for most fitness watches today. The TomTom Spark has some similar designs with previous TomTom watches but it’s lighter and has slightly smaller screen. Its strap is also noticeably slimmer and lighter.

What makes a TomTom Spark sparkle from each model?

The TomTom Spark comes in four different models.

  1. Spark
  2. Spark Cardio
  3. Spark Music
  4. Spark Cardio + Music​

To make it easy to remember, all models have the same core features: GPS, multisport capability, and 24/7 activity tracking. Adding the term “Cardio” means you get the built-in HRM and Heart-Rate Training Zone feature while adding the term “Music” means you get the music playback capability and Audio Performance Feedback feature. The TomTom Spark Cardio + Music would then mean you get the built-in HRM, Heart-Rate Training Zone, music player, and Audio Performance Feedback along the core features.

A Note to Triathletes

One thing you do need to consider is that TomTom use the term “multisport” to mean it has pool swim, bike, run and freestyle modes. This is different from Garmin and Suunto where “multisport” mode means you can link multiple sports together to create a “multisport” and then press the lap button during a session to quickly transition from one sport to the next.

Known for being a leader in GPS technology, TomTom is one of the first GPS watch makers to integrate an optical heart rate monitor and a music player in one watch. The TomTom Spark Music comes with 3 GB of storage you can use for your favourite songs and can be paired with a compatible Bluetooth headphones. For runners who are tired of carrying a smartphone with them while running, the TomTom Spark Music offers the perfect blend of features need for a running watch.

Standard Features

All Spark models have the following features:

GPS Tracking: Track your time, pace, distance and calories burned.

Multisport Mode: Train in run, bike, swim, gym and treadmill modes.

24/7 Activity Tracking: Capture your steps, active minutes and calories burned.

Goal Setting: Set and track your progress on daily and weekly goals.

Automatic Sleep Tracking: Know if you’re getting the sleep you need.

Water Resistant (up to 50 metres): Run in all weather conditions.

Wireless Syncing: Sync your workouts wirelessly with your favorite apps.

Customizable Straps: Change your strap color to match your workout gear.

Ultra-Slim Design: Sleek and slim design provides ultra comfort during all your workouts.

Indoor Training Mode: Track your performance on the treadmill or in the gym.

Interval Training: Improve speed and fitness with customizable work-rest sessions.

Race Mode: Select one of your past performances to race against.

Source by Joseph Pasamonte

I’m tempted to say, “Almost anything,” because the calorie myth is being disproven over and over these days. Finally!

That myth is a distraction from the real effects of foods. Below are just a few.

1. Food and Brain Chemistry

No, there’s no brain chemistry in food. But certain properties of foods help the brain produce certain brain chemicals.

Protein foods supply amino acids.

As you remember from 7th grade biology (!!?!?), amino acids are the “building blocks of protein.” Aminos are used by the brain to make brain chemicals that influence our moods.

Three of them are dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. Protein also provides B vitamins to help the brain make those 3 chemicals.

Dopamine is associated with pleasure and reward. It triggers alertness, clarity and faster response time. A brain on dopamine is ready for action.

Norepinephrine is another reward chemical that triggers alertness. It’s anti-depressive and has analgesic properties.

Serotonin makes us feel relaxed and calm. It decreases stress, anxiety and depression. It’s also an analgesic. With food, serotonin produces satiety, especially for carbs.

To take advantage of the natural properties of protein foods, eat fish, shrimp, crab, poultry, eggs, beef, cottage cheese, high-protein yogurt.

But I’m Vegan!

Use the many plant protein powders available. Hemp, pea, brown rice, sacha inchi, and vegetable protein powders effectively replace animal proteins. Vegan or not, never skimp on protein if you want your brain to function optimally.

2. Food and Hormones

We’re NOT talking about hormones given to animals that can harm the health of those who eat the foods. This section is about the hormones our bodies produce when we eat specific foods.

Here are 3 examples of how hormones triggered by foods can affect us.

CCK

When we eat fats and/or protein foods, the body releases CCK (cholecystokinin).

CCK is almost magic. It makes us feel we’ve had enough food and don’t need more for a while. It decreases appetite for carbohydrates and also stops carb cravings.

Insulin

When we eat starches (“carbs”), the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin is absolutely vital, but in excess can cause trouble. What can excess insulin do?

• It promotes fat storage, moving glucose into fat stores.

• It inhibits fat utilization (oxidation), so we burn carbohydrate for fuel instead.

• It promotes inflammation and is at the heart (!) of a number of metabolic conditions that increase the risk of heart disease.

Glucagon

When we eat protein, the body releases glucagon. Glucagon moves fat from storage into the bloodstream, so it can be used for energy.

Those are only 3 of the hormones that respond to specific foods we eat. As you can see, they have benefits that make them more compelling than calories in / calories out.

3. Food and Sleep

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter and sometimes classified as a hormone. It’s produced in the brain and the intestines and is found in platelets and other locations. It’s a vasoconstrictor.

Serotonin is best known as an antidepressant but does a lot more.

In the GI tract, it helps to control appetite, especially for carbs.

When we’re injured, serotonin is released by the platelets. It triggers vasoconstriction to decrease blood flow and promotes blood clot formation.

What If We Don’t Have Enough?

Low serotonin is linked with anxiety, low self-esteem, cravings for sweet and/or starchy carbs, and sleep difficulties.

If you have trouble falling asleep at night, try eating a small portion of healthful starch about 80 or 90 minutes before bed. The starch will start the process that allows the brain to produce serotonin. Serotonin in turn produces melatonin, often called the sleep hormone. All natural, no side effects.

If your sleep problem is waking up in the middle of the night and not getting back to sleep, starches will help you fall asleep again.

Keep your portions small. The idea is to change brain chem, not add another meal.

ALSO! This works best if you eat protein with your meals and snacks throughout the day.

As you can see, food is much more (and more interesting!) than calories in / calories out.

Source by Joan Kent

There’s one thing I can’t stand about the fitness industry:

It’s full of bitches. (Ironically, I’m now going off on a bitch – ha! Hey, if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em!)

Anyway, there’s a ton of different forms of exercise you can do. Literally tons.

First off, you’ve got weight training in the gym. Then that can be broken down further into many “mini-categories”. For example, you’ve got bodybuilding style training, you’ve got Olympic lifting (no prizes for guessing that’s the thing they do in the… *drumroll*… Olympics!). You’ve also got powerlifting, too, as well as strong-man type training. Oh, and how could I forget CrossFit, too?!

And if you want to go even more in-depth, you can break these 4 categories down even further.

Anyway, we’ll move on from weight lifting. Let’s look at some other types of exercise…

So you’ve also got cardio training, which, just like weight training, can obviously be broken down further. You’ve got running, cycling, rowing, circuit training. Literally too many options for me to even think about, let alone actually write down.

Then you’ve got playing a sport.

And there’s also things like yoga and pilates.

So the point is this: There’s literally a TON of ways you can exercise.

But the one thing I hate about the fitness industry, is that so many people talk down upon on every other form of exercise that isn’t their own. They say it’s “wrong”. They say their way is the best way by a mile.

Do you know what I say to these people?

Shut up!.

Blunt? Yes.

But do they deserve it? Again, yep. Look, the Western world has got overweight. It doesn’t need me to tell you that. So surely we should be encouraging everyone to do any form of exercise, no matter what it is?

But to some people, seeing people exercise in a way that’s different to their own actually annoys them! Pathetic isn’t it. I mean, the amount of people who train in the gym bodybuilding style who look down on crossfitters is unbelievable.

See, I’ve never done CrossFit in my life. Is it perfect? No. There’s a much higher risk of injury (especially for beginners) as opposed to most other forms of training.

But, having said that, does it look fun? Yep!

Does it get people breathing hard and sweating? Yep!

And does it get people great fitness results, whilst helping tone them up? Again, absolutely!

So why so many people speak crap about it is beyond me.

Anyway, to wrap this up, I want to say this:

Do a form of exercise you ENJOY.

That’s literally it, my friend.

Don’t let Bob down the gym, Steve next door, or even me tell you what form of exercise you should be doing.

Just do something you’re gonna stick to.

‘Course, if you want to be a bodybuilder, then you’re gonna have to get in the gym and start lifting weights. Going out for long-distance runs ain’t gonna get you there!

But if you just want to tone up, lose weight, and get fitter so you’ve got more energy and you look and feel better, then just do something you enjoy.

Simple.

Source by Tom Andrews

In 2009 and 2010, the Ab Circle Pro was the biggest selling abdominal exercise machine in the world. Until today, it is reported to have sold over 2 million times in the United States, Canada, Britain, Europe, Australia, and even India, among others.

The product was presented by Jennifer Nicole Lee, a famous fitness model who has her own little fitness “empire” comprised of programs, supplements, and fitness products. The Ab Circle Pro was her biggest success to date.

Recently, though Jennifer Nicole Lee announced the release of a new version of her best selling machine: The Ab Circle Mini.

As the name implies, the Mini was designed to mimic the original version of the machine but at a smaller scale. In terms of how these two machines are used and the results they’re supposed to deliver there is really no difference. After all, the original version as well as the new one are marketed as a way to flatten your abs and lose inches with short workouts that can be done at home. This means that if you don’t think the original version works, you won’t find anything really different in how the Mini Circle version works.

The first difference that does exist between the two products is the price. The original Ab Circle Pro costs about $200 while the mini version can be purchased for about $140, a sizable discount. The new price may be one which is more appealing to people who felt they could not afford to buy the original abdominal machine.

The second difference is in the size and weight of the Ab Circle Mini. It is smaller and lighter than the Ab Circle pro. This makes it easier to store and more portable. However, there may be less stability to the machine due to its lightness so you’d need to work slowly with it at first to make sure its stable.

The most important thing was and remains the kind of results you can get with these machines. Both can give you a workout, of that there is no doubt. However, for some people the workout will not be very effective. It seems to be geared more for beginners than for people who are used to exercise regularly.

Whether you choose to get the original version or the mini, be aware that it’s crucial to continue working out the rest of your body and to maintain a healthy diet in order to get any kind of results.

Source by John Davenport

The Minnesota Model is described by McElrath in 1997 as being “inextricably interwoven with the program, practice and philosophy of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)”. The AA movement conferred the belief that alcoholism is a physical, mental and spiritual illness and developed the Twelve Steps, which outline a spiritual solution, and the concept of a fellowship where recovery can take place.

The Hazelden Foundation was established in 1949 as an environment in which respect, understanding and acceptance of the dignity of each patient was promoted. The belief developed that time spent in association with other alcoholics, talking with one another and sharing life experiences, was central to recovery. Alcoholism was conceptualized within the disease model as a complex, existential condition of “dis-ease”, which could be relieved by sharing experiences. Furthermore, there was a fundamental belief that addicts have an inherent ability to change their beliefs, attitudes and behaviors to restore health.

Two long-term treatment goals of the Minnesota Model are total abstinence from all mood-altering substances and an improved quality of life. Consistent with the philosophy of AA, the objectives for the individual are to grow in transcendental, spiritual awareness, to recognize personal choice and responsibility, and to develop peer relationships. The resources for recovery, then, lie primarily within the addict with treatment providing the opportunity to discover and use those resources and the therapeutic atmosphere conducive to change. This approach is by nature client-centered.

Much of the work done by clients toward achieving those goals is done within the context of group therapy. Engaging with counselors and members of the peer group, the alcoholic / addict is encouraged to develop meaningful relationship experiences and clarify feelings and definitions of reality. Success of the process is characterized by relief, peace, increased sense of self worth, acceptance by self and the group, and the existential restoration of meaning to life.

The success of the Minnesota Model stems from it addressing the fundamental existential issues of addiction. Common to AA, it is rooted in existential philosophy and incorporates a treatment philosophy and treatment approach that addresses the core issues of addiction. This existential philosophy allows for a caring, nurturing, client-centered environment where the Twelve Steps provide direction and patients suffering from addiction can find healing.

Patients with co-morbid mental health conditions receive concomitant treatment for both conditions within a co-therapy concept. A common mental health diagnosis among chemically dependent patients is borderline personality disorder (BPD), a pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affect along with impulsivity. About 40% of chemically dependent subjects are also diagnosed with BPD. Those with BPD seem especially prone to the use of substances in order to cope with unwanted affective states.

The frequent co-occurrence of addiction with other mental health problems is of relevance and importance to chemical dependency (CD) counseling. For example, patients with BPD are likely to evoke strong and often negative responses among CD professionals. There is a risk that patients presenting with symptoms of BPD may be negatively stereotyped and treated inappropriately. There may be the tendency for staff to describe the patient in vivid and dramatic terms that can set negative expectations even before the patient arrives on the treatment unit. There may be a tendency to react to self-harming or suicidal acts with horror and/or anger. The CD counselor needs to understand this behavior in the context of the patient’s underlying pain and distress and their inability to express or process those feelings. Counselors need to be educated to understand the etiology and manifestations of disorders such as BPD in order to appreciate the worldview of patients with dual disorders and enhance empathy and respect shown all patients.

Thus, while the Minnesota model has become recognized as the gold standard of chemical dependency residential care across North America, it has some inherent limitations. The disease concept, while introducing scientific rigor and a conceptual framework for conducting research and assigning treatment, is limited by the tendency to label clients as ‘sick’, risking breeding stereotypical views and treatment approaches by clinical staff. Viewing the problem as being the ‘disease’ tends to shift the focus from the individual, manifested within the model by the tendency to conduct group therapy to the relative exclusion …

Starting your fitness journey isn’t easy. There are no magic pills, or no get fit quick programs that will make you fit overnight. It takes continuous work and effort to keep advancing forward.

If you are currently on your fitness journey, I congratulate you. You are taking steps towards leading a healthier life. If you have yet to start a fitness regimen, what is holding you back? Why haven’t you started?

Chances are, you probably have a reason why you haven’t been exercising. In my opinion any reason not to work out is an excuse. Excuses will keep you from living a healthier life, and they are a way to shift the blame from yourself.

When it boils down to it, the only reason you haven’t been exercising is because of you. No one else is to blame, and you can’t say you don’t have enough time. There is always time to exercise, and there is always a way to fit it into a schedule.

Excuses like, “I’ll do it tomorrow,” just delay and prevent you from getting anything done. After all, when tomorrow comes, the same excuse is often used. Someday never comes, so today is always the best day to start if you want change.

Don’t put it off any longer. It is hard to exercise, and it may bring you pain to start a fitness regimen. However, when you don’t do it, you are hurting yourself and your body, so the pain of exercising is worth overcoming.

Today you can begin your journey towards better fitness. In fact, as soon as you are done reading this article you can find a fitness program to start, or formulate your own. You can begin to eat healthier, and start making better decisions.

Starting can be the hardest part for many people. If starting isn’t hard enough, it is even harder for others to actually keep going. Many people eat well, and exercise well for a couple of days and then throw it all out the window and fall back into old habits.

It takes time to establish a habit. The idea is to continue to exercise and eat healthy, and if you fall off the horse for a day, instead of falling back to your old ways, jump back on the horse and keep trotting along. Don’t let a few days of unhealthy choices keep you from continuing your course. Stay on your journey towards better health and keep pushing forward, because the journey never ends.

It’s time to throw out the excuses and start today. What is holding you back from starting your journey towards better fitness?

Source by Marcus Liberty

Back to top