Tag: Workplace

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Good Health and Safety in the Workplace is easy to achieve with these 7 easy tips to help keep your workers safe. By following the steps shown, you will ensure that all staff are both aware of their responsibilities and that you have done your utmost to give them protection from hazards.

1) Responsibility. Remind your staff that they are responsible for their Health & Safety. Their actions have an effect on themselves and others and it is useful to remind everyone from time to time. As Business Owner you are also responsible so make sure you are leading by example.

2) Tidiness. It is so simple but lots of business owners don’t keep their workplace tidy – workers need to their area clean and tidy. Sometimes this is difficult of course if a process is messy but enough time should be given to clean up and treated as important and not allowed to be missed. By simply tidying up this can prevent needless accidents taking place eg slips, trips and falls that account for 30% of workplace accidents

3) Train staff. Reminding staff how to act safely is key in keeping your business safe. The law states that you need to train staff and yet most business owners don’t. There are plenty of online training applications that can be used that are both cost & time effective. These will help you demonstrate you have complied with the law and encourage a safer working environment.

4) Report ALL accidents, including those that nearly happened. Although this needs to be managed so it doesn’t become too onerous, knowing what accidents are happening can give you valuable information on what you need to fix. A good way to encourage more reporting is to focus on reporting accidents for one month and see what the results are.

5) Involve staff. Like any management activity, not involving staff can leave them feeling left out and not engaged. Involve staff with Health & Safety in the workplace and by having more input they should feel they are being listened too and the appropriate actions taken. As a Business Owner you will also need to co-operate and explain how and why decisions were taken eg not to replace a new machine but additional safety controls put in place and more training due to the expense involved.

6) Prepare for the worst. As a business owner you need to assume the worst will happen and staff or customers will need emergency treatment or the action to take if a fire takes place. If you can prepare beforehand it makes it less likely to be such a problem if it does take place in real life.

7) Find out about Risk Assessments. They are a key tool in helping manage Health and Safety in the Workplace as they show you have thought about risks and put control measures in place. Not only is it a legal requirement, it will help reduce accidents. Risk Assessments should be simple, straightforward and easy to understand – especially by the staff who are involved and they need to be included in the process.

Although these seem very simple and easy to follow, many companies do not do some, or in a few cases any, of them leaving them open to possible legal and criminal prosecution in the event of a serious accident. So always ensure that your company does not fall into this possible situation by taking some time out and following the seven tips above.

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Source by Nigel J Welford

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The leading cause of death in the US according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC.gov) is Cardiovascular disease. CPRGlobalAcademy.com is committed to teaching useful techniques for saving lives. It is important to remember that Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be applied in many ways. If a person has drowned, had a heart attack, had a stroke, went into cardiac arrest or is choking proper training could be the difference between life and death of the patient. If the patient is not breathing, is unconscious or has no pulse CPR should be applied immediately. Always remember proper CPR begins with chest compressions.

It is important to note that death is most likely to occur after 10 minutes of loss of oxygen to the brain. From 6 to 10 minutes brain damage is expected. From 4 to 6 minutes brain damage is very possible and from 0 to 4 minutes brain damage is virtually non-existent.

Understanding CPR

When the heart stops beating blood stops flowing throughout the body. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is when one person performs chest compressions and breathing into a patient who does not have pulse or who is not breathing. Chest compressions combined with breathing into the patient will carry the now oxygenated blood throughout the body and into the brain. CPR acts like an artificial heart moving the blood rich in oxygen into the brain.

If CPR is performed on the patient the chances of survival increases and continues to increase if the AED is applied and if medical help arrives within ten minutes.

Any persons who assist those who are injured, ill or in peril are protected by the Good Samaritan Law. As long as they're acting voluntary, without expectation of reimbursement or compensation while performing such aid, on site-they'll have legal protection. Remember, when performing CPR every second counts so, unless required otherwise, don't hesitate to call 911, perform CPR or external chest compressions immediately.

Before you attempt CPR upon a patient there are several things you must do. Make sure you and / or the patient aren't in any danger-if possible, resolve the danger and if not, move the victim out of harms way. If unable to, for whatever reason, immediately call 911.

Check the patient and see if he / she is conscious or not. Do not check for a pulse because time is of the essence and finding a pulse can take too much time. Call out to the patient asking, "Are you okay?" Repeat if necessary, and if the patient does not respond, immediately call 911 and then perform CPR-initiating Circulation, Airway and Breathing Tasks (the CA-B's) and not the AB-C's. Also, if possible have someone else call 911 and begin CPR, immediately.

It's important to note: that the latest 2010 AHA guidelines recommends in-confident performers should, at least, perform chest compressions upon the patient, since studies show chest compressions can be as effective as the combination of CPR.

C is for Circulation – Adult Compressions

Circulation – chest compressions circulate the blood within the patient. It's important to place your hands correctly upon the patient's chest. To do so, find the point where both halves of the patient's ribs meet, interlock your fingers and with the palm of your hand, you'll compress. It's important to kneel beside the patient while doing so, for maximum compression. Once in position, lock your elbows and use your body's weight to compress 2 inches upon the patient's chest. Compress again, once the chest inflates back into position. A ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths (30: 2) is the recommended amount while compressing 100 times a minute. Remember, you should administer CPR until help arrives.

A is for Airway – Clear the airway

Airway – Make sure the patient is on a solid surface (on the backside). Next, kneel next to the patient's neck and shoulders. Open the patient's airway by tilting the head back with the palm of one hand while gently lifting the chin with the other hand. For no more than 10 seconds, check for life: listen for any sounds, put your cheek next to the patient's mouth to feel any breaths while also looking for any motion. If the patient …

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A Health & Safety (H&S) policy is a written promise of the Business Owners and the Senior Management to provide a healthy and safe workplace. The starting point, the foundation of Health and Safety in the workplace.

Many Occupational Health & Safety Regulations require that policy is developed, all workers are aware of and be trained on the policy (document, document, document). The policy is posted in the workplace, reviewed at least annually and a program is developed and maintained to implement the policy. This statement provides the regulatory requirement for a Health and Safety Management System (HSMS) in the workplace. Check your local regulatory requirements. We will review the Health and Safety Management System (HSMS) requirements in further detail later in this article.

Policy Examples

A quick Google search can provide thousands of examples of Workplace Health & Safety policies to obtain some suggestions to start yours. Please note that this exercise is to view different policies and commitments – We should not just Copy, Cut and Paste. That said, please search Google for these three policies to view a variety of policies. (Not allowed to have links in this article – sorry)

Bruce Power (Nuclear Power Company) Occupational Health & Safety Policy

Shell (Oil & Gas Company) Health, Safety & Environment

IHC (Advocates and Support Services) Health & Safety Policy Statement

You will notice that these policies from Companies all over the world and vastly different sizes and sectors, but they do have many similar sections.

Commitment: To provide a healthy and safe workplace for everyone their workers, contractors, and visitors. Meet or exceed the legal requirements.

The Goal: To eliminate all injuries and illness towards zero harm or injury free.

Responsibility: Management has accepted their responsibility to provide a healthy and safe workplace. Define that safety is everyone's responsibility – all employees

The reason for the similarities is due in part by most of these sections being defined in the various regulations and international standards.

ISO Standard 45001

One of the international standards that will help improve workplace health & safety is the new ISO (International Standards Organization) 45001. Here is a section taken from the draft standard on the subject of Health and Safety Policies.

Top management shall establish, implement and maintain an OH&S policy that includes a commitment to provide safe and healthy working conditions for the prevention of work-related injury and / or ill health and is appropriate to the purpose, the size, and context of the organization and to the specific nature of its OH&S risks and OH&S opportunities.

The standard provides very similar direction contained in the various regulatory and highlights the requirement to ensure the policy is based on the organizations "specific nature of its OH&S risks and OH&S opportunities. While similar in some sections the workplace health and safety policy needs to be workplace specific based on your identified risks, from your risk assessment.

Health & Safety Management System (HSMS)

In addition to developing a workplace health and safety policy, the employer is required (in some jurisdictions) to have a program to implement the policy. An HSMS is a collection of policies and procedures based on the specific workplace risks.

Common Sections – Worker Orientations, First Aid, Wellness, Fire Prevention, Worker Training, Workplace Inspections, Incident & Near Miss Investigations, Hazard Reporting, Indoor Air Quality, Ergonomics, Safe Lifting, Violence & Harassment, Safety Meetings, etc.

The other sections would be workplace hazard specific and could include sections on, Confined Space Entry, Hot Work Permits, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), Arc Flash, etc.

The expectation would be that a commitment to provide a healthy and safe workplace is made with the policy and the HSMS is the how you will achieve this.

Signing Authority

The policy is signed by the person or persons responsible for ensuring the health and safety of the employees – usually the most senior person – President, Chief Operating Officer, etc. If your company is large with many locations, have the President sign and the most senior person at the facility. You can also invite Union Representatives sign on to the policy and all of your employees.

The policy should be reviewed and signed each year. Review the policy …

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The direct commitment of senior management and the participation of employees in the development of workplace health policies are an essential prerequisite to the successful implementation of policies that are designed to address the real needs of the working community.

The following main steps and/or activities should be considered in the development and implementation of workplace health management at the enterprise level:

· Develop a short policy statement from the employer or senior executive that explicitly states senior management’s commitment to and acceptance of responsibility for the health management strategy within the company.

· Educate managers and workers on the impact of environmental, occupational and lifestyle factors on their health and social well-being and on the economic situation and competing ability of the company to facilitate their participation in health management.

· Determine the role of the medical, nursing, environmental and safety experts and other professionals needed to assist in the implementation of the health management strategy in the company.

· Discuss economic appraisal of existing and projected outcomes to health, safety, and environmental health from the activities of the company.

· Train staff in quality management principles and standards to be used for the workplace health management system. These are the same as those applied to quality assurance in the management of manufacturing, servicing or marketing operations.

· Assure participation of management and employees in the development and implementation of workplace health management systems in the company.

· Develop adequate tools for monitoring and evaluation of health, safety, social, economic and environmental outcomes to determine the impact on well-being of employees and competitiveness of the company.

· Introduce systematic internal auditing and evaluation to be able to make necessary adjustments to the workplace health management system of the company.

· External audit by a recognized certifying body, if necessary.

Key steps in implementing workplace health Policies

The prerequisite for establishing good practice in workplace health management in companies is the conscious and creative support as well as the fullest possible participation of senior management, employees and their trade union representatives.

They would co-operate in the development of the workplace health policy and in its implementation with the assistance of appropriate experts, e.g. from occupational health services, environmental health services or health promotion agencies, preferably from multidisciplinary preventive services. Quality management systems and internal and external auditing is believed to be supportive to the creation and maintenance of a healthy enterprise. Leading companies are increasingly integrating their health management and environment management into the overall corporate management system. The health and environment policy of the company determines targets, define processes, and assure financial and human resources necessary to act on the health determinants and improve social and physical environments in order to:

  • Create the greatest gain in health and working ability for the entire staff, and if possible, also for their families
  • Provide a safe and healthy working environment for employees while preserving the general environment and health of people living outside the premises
  • provide healthy and environmentally friendly products and services
  • ensure human rights of the entire staff

Coming up in the next chapter ” Key Benefits of Workplace Health Management

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Source by Craig Michael Page

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Just a couple weeks ago I posted this epic guidance: “8 Ways to Debunk Wellness and Health Promotion Research Papers.” It obviously rocked the world of the scientific health-publishing community.

Since then, editorial review boards of respected research journals in the population and workplace-health fields have called emergency meetings. The boards admitted a need for more diligence in evaluating article submissions, and then improving objective, peer-review standards prior to publication. My phone is ringing off the hook. HA! NOT!!

In fact, the Journal of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (JOEM) just published an article titled, “Does Whale Oil Illuminate Darkness Effectively?” Well, that wasn’t exactly the title. But it was close. It was actually, “Do Workplace Health Promotion (Wellness) Programs Work?” The article manages to include most of my eight warning signs for being invalid.

My colleague (defined as another person who knows the lyrics for the great tunes of the 60s and 70s) Jon Robison, PhD (see note below) just asked 13 questions about the JOEM paper of the lead author, which I think should be answered.

The reference to “the parallel universe” means that the conclusions Goetzel and company came up with have no relation to our known laws of science. The conclusions are not of this earth. In essence, you have to suspend reality to accept Goetzel’s claims. That’s a fair criticism.

Al Lewis, PhD, and Vik Khanna, have been calling Dr. Goetzel on these issues for years. If you haven’t read Lewis and Khanna’s book, “Surviving Workplace Wellness, With Your Dignity, Finances and (Major) Organs Intact,” you should if you’re working in workplace wellness or health promotion. And of course, don’t miss the most in-depth (and sometimes scathing) review of that work, which I bravely posted, “Al Lewis and Vik Khanna criticized me in their new book, Surviving Workplace Wellness. And now my life is over.”

Khanna (once again) took exception to Goetzel’s JOEM paper in his post, “Do Workplace Health Promotion Wellness Programs Work?: Ron Goetzel’s circularity.” Lewis makes a comment on Khanna’s blog opening with the statement, “It might be nice if Mr. Goetzel actually responded for a change.” Indeed.

What You As a Wellness or Health-Promotion Professional Should Do

Often employers and some brokers are unknowingly complicit in allowing these invasive and ineffective wellness programs into workplaces. Workplace wellness as it’s currently practiced is starting to be challenged by mainstream media and the weakness of the concept is becoming more widely understood.

And not too long ago I published, “5 Questions That Will Make Your Wellness Vendors Think They’re Having a Bad Nightmare… A Workplace-Wellness Critique.”

I don’t suggest an anti-wellness movement. But the entire paradigm, our thinking about it, and new solutions are needed. There are a lot of good people out there with better ideas based on common sense and sound science. That’s why I remain optimistic that workplace wellness can transition, change, and evolve into a meaningful and effective way to help people enjoy their careers and to be healthier. But we have to let go of what doesn’t work.

Which reminds me of a popular old quote, “There is no right way to do the wrong thing.”

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Source by Shawn Connors

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